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Researching and Teaching the History of Human Rights: A Workshop for the Routledge History of Human Rights

History Department Events - May 26, 2017 - 10:00am
History
Friday, May 26, 2017 - Saturday, May 27, 2017
9:00 AM to 5:00 PM


129 Herring Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


This workshop brings together authors of a volume of essays on the history of human rights. While it is not a closed session, it is a working conference. There are no paper presentations. All participants have read precirculated chapter drafts and at the workshop they will work in large and small groups to improve these drafts. Volume co-editors are Jean Quataert, Professor of History, Binghamton University, and Lora Wildenthal, Professor of History, Rice University. Our volume historicizes human rights norms, visions, institutions, and activists in both local and international settings from the late 19th century until the present. We foreground the local and regional development of rights, humanitarian principles, discourses, institutions, and advocacy over these ca. 150 years. The volume also translates across disciplinary divides to be truly useful to the university instructor in human rights, a multidisciplinary field that extends well beyond law schools. The volume is under contract with Routledge. For more information on event or participants, contact: Lora Wildenthal, Professor of History and Associate Dean of Humanities wildenth@rice.edu

Lie algebraic similarity transformations: improving wavefunctions for weak and strong correlations

Rice University Events Calendar - May 23, 2017 - 3:00pm
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
Physics & Astronomy

Speaker: Jacob Wahlen-Strothman
Tuesday, May 23, 2017
2:00 PM to 5:00 PM


200 Brockman Hall for Physics



We present a class of correlated wavefunctions generated by exponentials of two-body on-site Hermitian operators that can be evaluated with polynomial computational cost via a Hamiltonian similarity transformation. Wavefunctions of this form have been studied with variational Monte Carlo methods, but we present a formalism to perform non-stochastic calculations. The Hausdorff series generated by these Jastrow factors can be summed exactly without truncation resulting in a set of equations with polynomial computational cost. The correlators include the density-density, collinear spin-spin, spin-density cross terms, and on-site double occupancy operators. The resulting non-Hermitian many-body Hamiltonian can be solved in a biorthogonal mean-field approach with only a small set of correlation terms required for accurate calculations in systems with local interactions. Although the energy of the model is unbound, projective equations in the spirit of coupled cluster theory lead to well-defined solutions. The theory is tested on the one and two-dimensional repulsive Hubbard model where it yields accurate results for large systems with low computational cost. Symmetry projection methods are included to further improve the reference wavefunction and results under strong correlation without sacrificing good quantum numbers resulting in very accurate energies for small systems and producing a better ground state for the calculation of other properties.

Deadline: Last day to drop courses via ESTHER and receive an 80% refund of tuition for Summer Session II

Rice University Events Calendar - May 23, 2017 - 1:00am
Academic Calendar
Tuesday, May 23, 2017




Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



Trajectory of a Curve

Rice University Events Calendar - May 22, 2017 - 9:30pm
Shepherd School of Music
Houston Arts Alliance

Artist: Scuffed ShoeArtist: Alexandra Smither
Monday, May 22, 2017
8:30 PM to 9:30 PM


James Turrell Skyspace James Turrell Skyspace
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Trajectory of a Curve
A Sound and Light Composition by Kurt Stallmann
World Premiere of a site-specific composition for "Twilight Epiphany," the James Turrell Skyspace at the Suzanne Deal Booth Centennial Pavillion. Performers include Alexandra Smither, soprano and Scuffed Shoe Percussion Duo.
8:30 p.m., James Turrell Skyspace

Baby Driver<br>Written and Directed by Edgar Wright

Rice University Events Calendar - May 22, 2017 - 8:30pm
Visual and Dramatic Arts
Dean of Humanities
Rice Cinema
Monday, May 22, 2017
7:30 PM to 9:30 PM


Cinema (Rm #100) Rice Media Center
Rice University - Entrance #8, University Blvd & Stockton Ave
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Talented getaway driver Baby (Ansel Elgort) relies on the beat of his personal soundtrack to be the best in the game. After meeting the woman (Lily James) of his dreams, he sees a chance to ditch his shady lifestyle and make a clean break. Coerced into working for a crime boss (Kevin Spacey), Baby must face the music as a doomed heist threatens his life, love and freedom.

Below please find the link for the passes.
Link: http://www.sonyscreenings.com/RiceBABYDRIVER

Written and Directed by: Edgar Wright
Produced by: Nira Park, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner
Cast: Ansel Elgort, Kevin Spacey, Lily James, Jon Berntha,l Eiza González with Jon Hamm and Jamie Foxx

2017 SXSW Film Festival Audience Award Winners:
“Baby Driver” Director: Edgar Wright

U.S.-Pakistan Relations: Challenges and Opportunities in an Age of Change

Rice University Events Calendar - May 22, 2017 - 7:30pm
James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy

Speaker: His Excellency Aizaz Ahmad Chaudhry
Monday, May 22, 2017
6:30 PM to 8:30 PM


Baker Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA

Registration Required


Pakistan sits in a complex geopolitical position, serving as a bridge between South Asia and the Middle East. The country’s long-simmering conflict with India, the situation in neighboring Afghanistan, and political, economic and social developments have all shaped Pakistan’s foreign policy. Historically, Pakistan’s relationship with the U.S. has been intermittently strategic, cooperative or cold. Still, the U.S.-Pakistan relationship is undeniably critical to regional and international security and stability. On May 22, H.E. Aizaz Ahmad Chaudhry, ambassador of Pakistan to the United States, will address the challenges and opportunities in the U.S.-Pakistan relationship. Join the conversation online with #BakerPakistan.

HPC Boot Camp

Rice University Events Calendar - May 22, 2017 - 9:00am
Ken Kennedy Institute for Information Technology
Monday, May 22, 2017 - Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM to 5:00 PM



Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA

Admission Charge


The HPC Boot Camp is organized by the Ken Kennedy Institute for Information Technology at Rice University in an effort to address a growing demand for training and education in high-performance computing and scientific programming. While the main driver for the Boot Camp has been participation from the oil and gas industry, the curriculum is broadly applicable to any field engaged in scientific computing where there is a need to harness more of the computing power offered by modern servers and clusters. The HPC Boot Camp offers participants, with a wide array of backgrounds, opportunities to be trained in modern programing techniques and tools. http://bootcamp.rice.edu/hpc-bootcamp/

Rice University Police Department Defensive Tactics (PPCT) 4 hour Refresher (RUPD Only)

Rice University Events Calendar - May 22, 2017 - 1:00am
Rice Police
Monday, May 22, 2017 - Friday, May 26, 2017



MPR Gibbs Recreation and Wellness Center
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Rice University Police Departments Annual Defensive Tactics 4 hour refresher class. Officers will sign up for one 4 hour session to complete the training requirements. Sign up posted in workroom. RUPD Staff only

FIRST DAY OF CLASSES - SUMMER SESSION II

Rice University Events Calendar - May 22, 2017 - 1:00am
Academic Calendar
Monday, May 22, 2017




Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



Deadline: Last day for late registration for Summer Session II

Rice University Events Calendar - May 22, 2017 - 1:00am
Academic Calendar
Monday, May 22, 2017




Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



“Things that divide us are trifling”: Cold War Feminism in North Korea with Suzy Kim

History Department Events - March 29, 2017 - 5:00pm
History

Speaker: Suzy Kim
Wednesday, March 29, 2017
4:00 PM to 5:30 PM


307 Sewall Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Feminism, both as theory and praxis, has long grappled with the dilemma of difference: that is, whether to celebrate women’s “difference” from men as offering a more emancipatory potential or to challenge those differences as man-made in the process of delineating modern sexed subjects. While this debate may be all too familiar within liberal feminist discourses, socialist feminisms that stretched across the Cold War divide were no less conflicted about what to do with gendered differences, most explicitly represented by sexual violence or biological motherhood. Situating North Korea in the broader frame of socialist feminisms, this talk explores how alternative femininities became markers of ideal citizens in the name of state feminism that professed equality for the sexes. While North Korea's authoritarian system is generally characterized as a paternalistic order, it is complemented by maternal affect that elicits love and loyalty for the leaders. In effect, women proved to be the primary cultural icons, and feminine tropes became models for emulation throughout society. Examining the development of alternative femininities in North Korea alongside a women’s history of the Cold War, I argue that the development of the feminist project itself was bifurcated by the global Cold War, the effects of which are still felt in the iterations of contemporary feminism today.

Suzy Kim is Associate Professor of Korean History in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at Rutgers University. Her publications include a special guest-edited volume of Cross-Currents: East Asian History & Culture Review on “(De)Memorializing the Korean War” (2015) and Everyday Life in the North Korean Revolution, 1945-1950 (Cornell 2013).

History and Other Social Sciences

History Department Events - March 28, 2017 - 7:30pm
History

Speaker: Herbert S Klein
Tuesday, March 28, 2017
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM


Farnsworth Pavilion, Ley Student Center Rice Media Center
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


History and the Other Social Sciences
Recent trends in the United States have turned historians away from the Social Sciences just as these fields have become far more historically oriented. This talk will show how and why these new trends in Economics and the Other Social Sciences can be of utility to historical research.

Biography:
Herbert S. Klein is Gouverneur Morris Professor Emeritus of History at Columbia University, is currently a Hoover Research Fellow and Latin American Curator at the Hoover Archives and former Professor of History and Director of the Center for Latin American Studies at Stanford University. He has published some 174 articles in multiple languages and authored several books on Bolivia: Parties and Political Change in Bolivia, 1880-1952 (1969, 2009); Revolution and the Rebirth of Inequality. (co-author) (1981); Haciendas and Ayllus (1993) and A Concise History of Bolivia (2nd edition 2011). His books on Slavery include most recently African Slavery in Latin American and the Caribbean (2nd ed co-authored 2007); The Middle Passage: Comparative Studies in the Atlantic Slave Trade (1969); The Atlantic Slave Trade (2nd edition 2009);and Slavery in Brazil (co-authored, 2009). On Brazil his most recent books (co-authored) are Slavery and the Economy of São Paulo, 1750-1850 (2003), Brazil Since 1980 (2006); Escravismo em São Paulo e Minas Gerais (2009); Economic and Social History of Brazil Since 1889 (2014), and Brazil, 1964-1985, The Military Regimes of Latin America in the Cold War (2017). On Latin American colonial fiscal history he wrote The American Finances of the Spanish Empire, 1680-1809 (1998) and co-authored a multi-volume collection of colonial tax records and has studied demographic history in A Population History of the United States (2nd ed, 2012) and Hispanics in the United States, 1980-2005 (co-author 2010).

Dr. Susan Einbinder - "Stone, Bone and Text: Anti-Jewish Violence in Tàrrega, 1348"

History Department Events - March 24, 2017 - 1:00pm
History
Friday, March 24, 2017
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM



Rice University - TBD



Dr. Susan Einbinder, Professor of Hebrew & Judaic Studies and Comparative Literature at the University of Connecticut In July of 1348 a large number of Jews in Tàrrega (Catalonia, Spain) were murdered during an uprising by Christians who blamed the Jews for the spread of the Black Death. Dr. Einbinder’s talk explores new and old sources related to the attack on the Jewish call (quarter) in Tàrrega after the arrival of the plague. The sources range from a well-known Hebrew chronicle excerpt to a previously unknown Hebrew lament, archival sources, and the forensic analysis of mass graves of the victims uncovered in 2007.

The Liberty to Take Fish: Cod Fisheries, American Diplomacy, and Atlantic Environments, 1783–1877

History Department Events - March 9, 2017 - 2:00pm
History

Speaker: Thomas Earle
Thursday, March 9, 2017
2:00 PM to 5:00 PM


315 Humanities Building



The Anglo-American relationship across the long nineteenth century was one that was marked by the periodic oscillations between confrontation and cooperation. While the discourse between the leaders of either nation was marked by a kind of gentlemanly civility any sort of linear approach to the emergence of the “Special Relationship” of the mid-twentieth century obscures the significant transformations in transatlantic diplomacy during the nineteenth century. North Atlantic fisheries played a key role as transatlantic relations tacked between agreement and discord during the nineteenth century. This single issue allowed for and created the conditions necessary for addressing myriad other concerns and in the process continually redefined the relationship. The significant pivots in Anglo-Americans relations were in one manner or other intimately tied to the fisheries. Introducing the fisheries issues will demonstrate how, for instance, the Convention of 1818, the Reciprocity Treaty of 1854, and the Halifax Commission were the most vital junctures in transatlantic relations. This narrative of Anglo-American relations would remain obscured without an appreciation for the fisheries and the role of the environment more generally. While environmental history has long appreciated how proceedings in the human world were influenced by the natural, or nonhuman, world, diplomatic historians have been slow to consider that nexus. The transformations that are the focus of this dissertation would be invisible without the environmental lens. Fishermen, in addition to the fish they sought, are likewise important actors in this story as the on the ground, or perhaps water, decisions they made influenced the course of diplomacy at every level.

Criminalizing Space: Ideological and Institutional productions of Race, Gender, and State-sanctioned Violence in Houston, 1948-1967

History Department Events - March 3, 2017 - 12:00pm
History

Speaker: David Ponton, III
Friday, March 3, 2017
12:00 PM to 3:00 PM


315 Humanities Building



Criminalizing Space is a social history of ideas that explores various ways racial residential segregation affected the life chances of black Houstonians during the middle of the twentieth century. Jim Crow polices, custom, and living patterns marginalized black citizens from their white counterparts, negatively shaping the ways white people could relate to black people and the places they lived in. As Jim Crow slowly withered away, however, Houstonians struggled to redefine the meaning of race in ways that could be compatible with liberal individualism. Many came to rely on spatial logics. Spatial distance undergirded the social distance that stratified groups in a persistent racial hierarchy. It allowed for sustained Negrophobia, which included notions that black people were inherently predisposed or culturally conditioned to live in squalor, indulge in vice, and practice crime. For many white Houstonians, these were inherent in black spaces and justified the need for their containment through various forms of municipal neglect and abuse. Despite the efforts of black women activists, politicians, and philanthropists, the criminalization of black spaces had devastating effects on black people. It overexposed them to environmental hazards, poverty, violent crime, and police brutality. Spatial marginalization exacerbated the effects of these on black women, who faced sexual assault at the hands of police officers and employers as well as increased risks for assault and murder by their intimate partners in their own homes.

Master’s Recital - Cancelled

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 8:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Daniel Egan
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
8:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Master’s Recital - Cancelled
Daniel Egan, trumpet
8:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Master’s Recital

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 8:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: David Olsen
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
8:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Master’s Recital
David Olsen, cello
5:30 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Creativity Up Close Lecture: The Surprising Path to Greater Creativity by Keith Sawyer

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 7:00pm
Humanities Research Center
Moody Art Center
Glasscock School of Continuing Studies
Arts Initiative Fund
Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative
[CLICK HERE TO REGISTER]

Speaker: Keith Sawyer
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
7:00 PM


Shepherd School | Stude Concert Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Please complete your registration. All lectures are free and open to the public but sitting is limited. This presentation is part of the Creativity Up Close Lecture Series.

Chao Center for Asian Studies Spring 2017 Film Series: <em>Sweet Dream</em> (1936) & <em>Keijo</em> (1940)

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 7:00pm
Chao Center for Asian Studies
Dean of Humanities
Rice Cinema

Speaker: Han Sang Kim
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
7:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Rice Media Center
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


In Sweet Dream, Aesun, a Korean Nora Helmer, gets a cab to catch the train that will take her to freedom.

Hiroshi Shimizu’s city symphony film Keijo depicts the streets and shopping promenades of colonial Seoul she might have strolled down.

"New Women on the Move" is a monthly Spring 2017 film series sponsored by the Chao Center of Asian Studies and hosted by Han Sang Kim, Annette and Hugh Gragg Postdoctoral Fellow in Transnational Asian Studies. Part of the ASIA 327 course, every film screening is open to the Rice community and will be followed by an open discussion. Films are shown in Korean with English subtitles.