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“Things that divide us are trifling”: Cold War Feminism in North Korea with Suzy Kim

History Department Events - March 29, 2017 - 5:00pm
History

Speaker: Suzy Kim
Wednesday, March 29, 2017
4:00 PM to 5:30 PM


307 Sewall Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Feminism, both as theory and praxis, has long grappled with the dilemma of difference: that is, whether to celebrate women’s “difference” from men as offering a more emancipatory potential or to challenge those differences as man-made in the process of delineating modern sexed subjects. While this debate may be all too familiar within liberal feminist discourses, socialist feminisms that stretched across the Cold War divide were no less conflicted about what to do with gendered differences, most explicitly represented by sexual violence or biological motherhood. Situating North Korea in the broader frame of socialist feminisms, this talk explores how alternative femininities became markers of ideal citizens in the name of state feminism that professed equality for the sexes. While North Korea's authoritarian system is generally characterized as a paternalistic order, it is complemented by maternal affect that elicits love and loyalty for the leaders. In effect, women proved to be the primary cultural icons, and feminine tropes became models for emulation throughout society. Examining the development of alternative femininities in North Korea alongside a women’s history of the Cold War, I argue that the development of the feminist project itself was bifurcated by the global Cold War, the effects of which are still felt in the iterations of contemporary feminism today.

Suzy Kim is Associate Professor of Korean History in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at Rutgers University. Her publications include a special guest-edited volume of Cross-Currents: East Asian History & Culture Review on “(De)Memorializing the Korean War” (2015) and Everyday Life in the North Korean Revolution, 1945-1950 (Cornell 2013).

History and Other Social Sciences

History Department Events - March 28, 2017 - 7:30pm
History

Speaker: Herbert S Klein
Tuesday, March 28, 2017
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM


Farnsworth Pavilion, Ley Student Center Rice Media Center
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


History and the Other Social Sciences
Recent trends in the United States have turned historians away from the Social Sciences just as these fields have become far more historically oriented. This talk will show how and why these new trends in Economics and the Other Social Sciences can be of utility to historical research.

Biography:
Herbert S. Klein is Gouverneur Morris Professor Emeritus of History at Columbia University, is currently a Hoover Research Fellow and Latin American Curator at the Hoover Archives and former Professor of History and Director of the Center for Latin American Studies at Stanford University. He has published some 174 articles in multiple languages and authored several books on Bolivia: Parties and Political Change in Bolivia, 1880-1952 (1969, 2009); Revolution and the Rebirth of Inequality. (co-author) (1981); Haciendas and Ayllus (1993) and A Concise History of Bolivia (2nd edition 2011). His books on Slavery include most recently African Slavery in Latin American and the Caribbean (2nd ed co-authored 2007); The Middle Passage: Comparative Studies in the Atlantic Slave Trade (1969); The Atlantic Slave Trade (2nd edition 2009);and Slavery in Brazil (co-authored, 2009). On Brazil his most recent books (co-authored) are Slavery and the Economy of São Paulo, 1750-1850 (2003), Brazil Since 1980 (2006); Escravismo em São Paulo e Minas Gerais (2009); Economic and Social History of Brazil Since 1889 (2014), and Brazil, 1964-1985, The Military Regimes of Latin America in the Cold War (2017). On Latin American colonial fiscal history he wrote The American Finances of the Spanish Empire, 1680-1809 (1998) and co-authored a multi-volume collection of colonial tax records and has studied demographic history in A Population History of the United States (2nd ed, 2012) and Hispanics in the United States, 1980-2005 (co-author 2010).

Dr. Susan Einbinder - "Stone, Bone and Text: Anti-Jewish Violence in Tàrrega, 1348"

History Department Events - March 24, 2017 - 1:00pm
History
Friday, March 24, 2017
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM



Rice University - TBD



Dr. Susan Einbinder, Professor of Hebrew & Judaic Studies and Comparative Literature at the University of Connecticut In July of 1348 a large number of Jews in Tàrrega (Catalonia, Spain) were murdered during an uprising by Christians who blamed the Jews for the spread of the Black Death. Dr. Einbinder’s talk explores new and old sources related to the attack on the Jewish call (quarter) in Tàrrega after the arrival of the plague. The sources range from a well-known Hebrew chronicle excerpt to a previously unknown Hebrew lament, archival sources, and the forensic analysis of mass graves of the victims uncovered in 2007.

The Liberty to Take Fish: Cod Fisheries, American Diplomacy, and Atlantic Environments, 1783–1877

History Department Events - March 9, 2017 - 2:00pm
History

Speaker: Thomas Earle
Thursday, March 9, 2017
2:00 PM to 5:00 PM


315 Humanities Building



The Anglo-American relationship across the long nineteenth century was one that was marked by the periodic oscillations between confrontation and cooperation. While the discourse between the leaders of either nation was marked by a kind of gentlemanly civility any sort of linear approach to the emergence of the “Special Relationship” of the mid-twentieth century obscures the significant transformations in transatlantic diplomacy during the nineteenth century. North Atlantic fisheries played a key role as transatlantic relations tacked between agreement and discord during the nineteenth century. This single issue allowed for and created the conditions necessary for addressing myriad other concerns and in the process continually redefined the relationship. The significant pivots in Anglo-Americans relations were in one manner or other intimately tied to the fisheries. Introducing the fisheries issues will demonstrate how, for instance, the Convention of 1818, the Reciprocity Treaty of 1854, and the Halifax Commission were the most vital junctures in transatlantic relations. This narrative of Anglo-American relations would remain obscured without an appreciation for the fisheries and the role of the environment more generally. While environmental history has long appreciated how proceedings in the human world were influenced by the natural, or nonhuman, world, diplomatic historians have been slow to consider that nexus. The transformations that are the focus of this dissertation would be invisible without the environmental lens. Fishermen, in addition to the fish they sought, are likewise important actors in this story as the on the ground, or perhaps water, decisions they made influenced the course of diplomacy at every level.

Criminalizing Space: Ideological and Institutional productions of Race, Gender, and State-sanctioned Violence in Houston, 1948-1967

History Department Events - March 3, 2017 - 12:00pm
History

Speaker: David Ponton, III
Friday, March 3, 2017
12:00 PM to 3:00 PM


315 Humanities Building



Criminalizing Space is a social history of ideas that explores various ways racial residential segregation affected the life chances of black Houstonians during the middle of the twentieth century. Jim Crow polices, custom, and living patterns marginalized black citizens from their white counterparts, negatively shaping the ways white people could relate to black people and the places they lived in. As Jim Crow slowly withered away, however, Houstonians struggled to redefine the meaning of race in ways that could be compatible with liberal individualism. Many came to rely on spatial logics. Spatial distance undergirded the social distance that stratified groups in a persistent racial hierarchy. It allowed for sustained Negrophobia, which included notions that black people were inherently predisposed or culturally conditioned to live in squalor, indulge in vice, and practice crime. For many white Houstonians, these were inherent in black spaces and justified the need for their containment through various forms of municipal neglect and abuse. Despite the efforts of black women activists, politicians, and philanthropists, the criminalization of black spaces had devastating effects on black people. It overexposed them to environmental hazards, poverty, violent crime, and police brutality. Spatial marginalization exacerbated the effects of these on black women, who faced sexual assault at the hands of police officers and employers as well as increased risks for assault and murder by their intimate partners in their own homes.

Master’s Recital - Cancelled

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 8:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Daniel Egan
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
8:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Master’s Recital - Cancelled
Daniel Egan, trumpet
8:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Master’s Recital

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 8:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: David Olsen
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
8:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Master’s Recital
David Olsen, cello
5:30 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Creativity Up Close Lecture: The Surprising Path to Greater Creativity by Keith Sawyer

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 7:00pm
Humanities Research Center
Moody Art Center
Glasscock School of Continuing Studies
Arts Initiative Fund
Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative
[CLICK HERE TO REGISTER]

Speaker: Keith Sawyer
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
7:00 PM


Shepherd School | Stude Concert Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Please complete your registration. All lectures are free and open to the public but sitting is limited. This presentation is part of the Creativity Up Close Lecture Series.

Chao Center for Asian Studies Spring 2017 Film Series: <em>Sweet Dream</em> (1936) & <em>Keijo</em> (1940)

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 7:00pm
Chao Center for Asian Studies
Dean of Humanities
Rice Cinema

Speaker: Han Sang Kim
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
7:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Rice Media Center
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


In Sweet Dream, Aesun, a Korean Nora Helmer, gets a cab to catch the train that will take her to freedom.

Hiroshi Shimizu’s city symphony film Keijo depicts the streets and shopping promenades of colonial Seoul she might have strolled down.

"New Women on the Move" is a monthly Spring 2017 film series sponsored by the Chao Center of Asian Studies and hosted by Han Sang Kim, Annette and Hugh Gragg Postdoctoral Fellow in Transnational Asian Studies. Part of the ASIA 327 course, every film screening is open to the Rice community and will be followed by an open discussion. Films are shown in Korean with English subtitles.

Sweet Dream (Lullaby of Death) (1936, 47min) and Keijo (1940, 24min) by YANG Chu-nam, SHIMIZU Hiroshi

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 7:00pm
Visual and Dramatic Arts
Dean of Humanities
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
7:00 PM to 8:45 PM


Cinema (Rm #100) Rice Media Center
Rice University - Entrance #8, University Blvd & Stockton Ave
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Sweet Dream (Lullaby of Death) (YANG Chu-nam, 1936, 47min) Ae-sun gets a cab to catch the train that will take her to freedom. Sweet Dream is a story of a Korean Nora Helmer who leaves home dreaming of a modern love affair. Keijo (SHIMIZU Hiroshi, 1940, 24min) Hiroshi Shimizu’s city symphony film Keijo depicts the streets and shopping promenades of colonial Seoul Ae-sun might have strolled down.
Additional Information: Free and open to the public

Declaration of Major Signing Ceremony

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 6:30pm
Sport Management
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM


Rice Stadium
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA

Registration Required


Each year the Department of Sport Management holds a "Declaration of Major Signing Ceremony" dinner reception for those students who officially declare us as their major. We will provide dinner and then honor each student. This event will feature a guest speaker from the sport industry. Also, representatives from "Rice Sport Business Society" will be present to speak to students about their club and their experience as a Sport Management major. Business professional dress attire **Please register via the Evite invitation by Friday, February 24**

Doctoral Recital

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 5:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Timothy Steeves
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
5:00 PM to 6:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Doctoral Recital
Timothy Steeves, violin
5:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Adaptive Program Reasoning via Online Learning

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 4:00pm
Computer Science

Speaker: Xin Zhang
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
4:00 PM


1070 Duncan Hall
Reception in Martel Hall before the Seminar
6100 Main St.
Houston,Texas,USA


Software is becoming increasingly pervasive and complex. These trends expose masses of users to unintended software failures and deliberate cyber-attacks. A widely adopted solution to enforce software quality is automated program analysis. A key challenge in designing an effective analysis is to decide what approximations to apply. Approximations are inevitable as program analysis problems are undecidable in general. The state-of-the-art relies on an expert analysis designer to choose fixed approximations. These approximations, however, often fail to meet the needs of individual usage scenarios as software artifacts and analysis clients become increasingly diverse. This in turn hinders the soundness, scalability, and precision of existing analysis tools. To address this challenge, this talk presents an online-learning-based approach that automatically adapts an analysis to a given usage scenario. By adapting to user feedback, program properties of interest, and characteristics of the program at hand, the approach synthesizes approximations that are optimal for the given setting. To enable learning, it converts a conventional program analysis specified by the analysis designer into a probabilistic analysis, which is expressed using a system of weighted constraints. Our empirical evaluation shows that this approach substantially reduces the numbers of false alarms produced by real-world analyses on large and widely used Java programs. I will also describe new algorithmic techniques to solve very large instances of weighted constraints that arise not only in our domain but also in other domains such as Big Data analytics and statistical AI.

BIOE Colloquia Series: Adhesive Hydrogels and Coatings Inspired by Mussels, Tea, Wine, and Chocolate

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 4:00pm
Bioengineering
Dean of Engineering

Speaker: Phillip B Messersmith, Ph.D.
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM


280 BioScience Research Collaborative
Rice University
6500 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



Master’s Recital - Cancelled

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 12:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: David Mamedov
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Master’s Recital - Cancelled
David Mamedov, piano
12:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Lunch Bunch

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 11:30am
Staff Advisory Committee
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
11:30 AM to 1:00 PM


Public Dining Room McMurtry College
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA

Registration Required/Admission Charge


Lunch Bunch for February at McMurtry College. Learn about the history of McMurtry college from various members of its community, including alumni, masters, associates and students.

Narratives of Death and Violence in the Global South, A Poetics of Displacement

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 10:00am
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
French Studies

Speaker: Adriana Umana
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
10:00 AM to 12:30 PM


310 Rayzor Hall



The field of French studies, responding to the growth of Francophone studies, has begun to consider the global dimension of French while questioning the very idea of homogeneous national cultures and literary traditions. “Narratives of Death and Violence in the Global South, A Poetics of Dislocation” maps the changing attitudes towards identity and belonging through representations of death in a body of literature produced in the Global South that, though diverse, is transforming notions of national and linguistic borders. Writing death for three writers born in Haiti, Guadeloupe and Colombia marks an important pendulum swing away from the national identifications of cultural productions and towards a transnational and interconnected subjectivity that transcends linguistic and geographic borders. The forms death representations take in their texts are strikingly different from those encountered in other postcolonial works, serving to transcend tragic and accusatory discourses, and offering an emancipatory project grounded on the present. Narratives of death in the postcolonial milieu have often been viewed in terms of their position against European traditions, their desire to return to an imagined and mythical common past, their reparative impulse to reconstruct the world. Critics have underscored their connection to collective memory, political engagement and literary theorization. Still others have pointed to the revitalization these texts effect on arid national literary landscapes. And yet these narratives of death are perhaps most interesting for their fundamental preoccupation with the quotidian, with the non-heroic dimension of characters and for their categorical refusal of genealogies. In “Narratives of Death and Violence ” scenes of death by René Depestre, Maryse Condé and Santiago Gamboa are read against those of their contemporaries to show that by creating characters whose survival depends on their capacity to live in the present, to mediate preposterous situations and to collaborate with equally disparate characters, the writers are advocating for the elaboration of what I term –borrowing from Edouard Glissant – a relational poetics of belonging. Insisting that it is only by renouncing heroism and its accompanying glory that characters are granted an afterlife, I focus on the ways in which death serves to describe the reality of a global imagination where every region is inextricably connected to what happens in the rest of world, and in turn, can only grasp its full meaning after a sense of the whole. Zombification for Depestre, mourning for Condé and violent crime for Gamboa constitute a third space for mediating living in displacement and for framing new possibilities for meaning.

School Composition and Discipline

Rice University Events Calendar - February 28, 2017 - 10:00am
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
Sociology

Speaker: Horace Duffy
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
10:00 AM to 12:30 PM


250 Sewall Hall



Prior research finds school discipline to be a highly racialized process that contributes to greater inequality. While individual student level characteristics have been found to contribute to the likelihood of receiving an exclusionary punishment, recently there has been interest in how school context, primarily the racial composition, contributes to this trend. Until now, prior research shows that percent black is associated with an increase in punitive disciplinary outcomes, yet little is known about the relationship of percent Latino and punishment. Using data from the Houston Independent School district, the current study examines the association of both individual and school level characteristics and the likelihood a student will receive discipline. This paper concludes that both percent black and Latino are associated with an increase in disciplinary actions and that the most disadvantaged students are most at risk of discipline controlling for other individual characteristics, while advantaged students have lower odd of being disciplined.

Guest Artist Recital

Rice University Events Calendar - February 27, 2017 - 8:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Eva AmslerArtist: Shalev Ed-Al
Monday, February 27, 2017
8:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Guest Artist Recital
Eva Amsler, Professor of Flute from Florida State University
Shalev Ed-Al, Israeli harpsichordist and conductor
8:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Collegium Concert

Rice University Events Calendar - February 27, 2017 - 7:30pm
Shepherd School of Music
Monday, February 27, 2017
7:30 PM to 9:00 PM


Hirsch Orchestra Rehearsal Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Collegium Concert
A program of music from the Renaissance.
7:30 p.m., Hirsch Orchestra Rehearsal Hall