Rice University Events Calendar

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Rice University Events Calendar
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(Church & Society Series) Immigrants' Rights and the American Civil Liberties Union of Texas

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Boniuk Institute for Religious Tolerance

Speaker: Edgar Saldivar
Sunday, February 12, 2017
9:30 AM to 10:30 AM



St. Philip Presbyterian Church
4807 San Felipe Street
Houston,Texas,USA


The ACLU of Texas is dedicated to reclaiming constitutional and civil rights for all Texans, regardless of immigration status. Immigrants in Texas contribute to our diversity and enrich our economy, but immigrant communities continue to be profiled, harassed, detained and demonized by extremist politicians and the militarized law enforcement agencies they control. Edgar Saldivar, Senior Staff Attorney for American Civil Liberties Union of Texas shares his passion to seek justice for the most vulnerable and underserved in our society.

2017 CLIC Conference on Study Abroad: Understanding the Study Abroad Experience

February 10, 2017 - 8:00am
Center for Languages and Intercultural Communication
Friday, February 10, 2017 - Saturday, February 11, 2017
8:00 AM to 5:30 PM



Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA

Admission Charge


For more information or to register for this event go to: clicstudyabroadconference.rice.edu

Tenth Annual Southern Forum on Agricultural, Rural, and Environmental History

February 10, 2017 - 12:01am
History
Friday, February 10, 2017 - Saturday, February 11, 2017
All Day


328 Humanities Building
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Rice University
February 10–11, 2017
Support provided by the Rice University History Department’s David Potter Lectureship in Southern History Fund
All sessions—including the keynote address—will take place in the Humanities Building, Room 328
Attendance is free, but registration is required if you wish to take part in any of the three meals provided. To register for meals, please email Randal Hall at rh@rice.edu and list the meals you would like to attend.

Friday, February 10, 2017
3:00 p.m.
Opening remarks
3:15 to 5:15 p.m.
Crossing Cultures in the Nineteenth Century:
Joseph Thomas Carson IV, Rice University
“Between Two Ships: Environmental History and the Anthropocene in Melville’s Oceans”

Patrick Luck, Florida Polytechnic University
“‘Your Friend Meuillon’: Cross-Cultural Economic Alliances in the Lower Mississippi Valley during the Early Republic”

Cane West, University of South Carolina
“‘Well Timbered and Watered’: Cross-Cultural Environmental Discourse in the Antebellum Arkansas River Valley”

5:30 to 6:45 p.m.
Humanities Building, third floor foyer and lounge
Drinks and dinner, buffet-style, catered by Picos Restaurant
Open to participants and any registered attendees

7:00 p.m.
Keynote Address S. Max Edelson, University of Virginia “The New Map of Empire: Cartographic Visions of Development in the British Atlantic World”

Saturday, February 11, 2017
9:00 to 9:30 a.m.
Humanities Building, third floor foyer and lounge
Continental breakfast for participants and registered attendees

9:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Food, Culture, and Landscape:
Hannah Biggs, Rice University “‘Louis Bromfield's 'Sermons on the Mount’: Religious Regionalism and Food Faith”

James C. Giesen, Mississippi State University “The View From Rose Hill: Landscape and Memory in the Piedmont”

Kelly C. Kean, University of California, Davis “Staples and Specialties: Regional Production for the Urban Market in Nineteenth-Century Charleston, South Carolina”

11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Lunch break
A boxed lunch will be provided for participants and any registered attendees.

12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
Resources and the State in the Interwar Years:
Davis Allen, Case Western Reserve University “Conservation Competition: Perspectives on Agricultural Drainage During the New Deal Era”

Abby Spinak, Rice University “The Most Laissez Faire: International Comparison as Energy Policy in the Interwar United States”

Michael Weeks, Our Lady of the Lake University “Measuring Expertise: How Engineers and Water Managers Shaped Irrigation on the Plains from 1910 to 1940”

2:45 to 3:00 p.m. Coffee break

3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Power, Economy, and Ecology in the Deep South:
Andrew C. Baker, Texas A&M University–Commerce “Rachel Carson’s Unlikely Disciples: Texas Real Estate Developers and the Battle against Hydrilla”

Alec Fazackerley Hickmott, Amherst College “From Equality to Enterprise: Civil Rights and the Strange Career of Federal Enterprise Zones in the Mississippi Delta, 1965–1993”

Caroline R. Peyton, Cameron University “The Plantation and the Reactor: Nuclear Power, Envirotechnical Risk, and the Louisiana Way”

http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~rh/SFARE.html

Feminist Research Group: Andrea Ballestero & Annelise Riles

December 9, 2016 - 4:00pm
Center for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality
Friday, December 9, 2016
4:00 PM to 6:00 PM


Room 116 Humanities Building
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


ATTENDANCE BY INVITATION ONLY. Not open to the public. Workshop for a CSWGS facility affiliate to present current research among colleagues in a seminar led by guest professor in the same field.

Class Recital

December 8, 2016 - 8:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Students of Norman Fischer
Thursday, December 8, 2016
8:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Class Recital
Cello students of Norman Fischer
8:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

(Jewish-Muslim Dialogue Series) Is Islam Anti-Semitic? Is Judaism "Islamophobic"?

December 8, 2016 - 7:00pm
Boniuk Institute for Religious Tolerance
Congregation Beth Yeshurun

Speaker: Mahmoud El-GamalSpeaker: Steve Morgen
Thursday, December 8, 2016
7:00 PM to 8:00 PM



Congregation Beth Yeshurun
4525 Beechnut
Houston,Texas,USA

Registration Required


Rabbi Steve Morgan and Professor Mahmoud El-Gamal lead a four-week dialogue aimed at fostering a greater appreciation for our respective Jewish and Muslim communities.

Class Recital

December 8, 2016 - 5:30pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Students of Virginia Weckstrom
Thursday, December 8, 2016
5:30 PM to 7:00 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Class Recital
Piano students of Virginia Weckstrom.
5:30 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

<b>ECE Seminar Series: Towards Practical Networked Systems for Data Centers, Kai Chen, HKUST (698/699)</b>

December 8, 2016 - 4:00pm
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Dean of Engineering
Computer Science

Speaker: Kai Chen
Thursday, December 8, 2016
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM


1064 Duncan Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Data centres are the main infrastructures for big data and cloud computing. In our SING lab at HKUST, we have been working on data center networking systems research for years. In this talk, I will start with briefly introducing a lab-scale 100-server data center cluster we built in the last 4 years and some representative networked system projects we implemented based on it. Then, I will elaborate more on the project of multi-level flow scheduling, and its adoption in practice to support real machine learning applications in a large Internet company. At last, I will conclude my talk with the plan on connecting lab research with real-world for more practical impacts.


Hierarchical normal mode refinement of anisotropic thermal parameters for supramolecular complexes

December 8, 2016 - 3:00pm
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
Applied Physics

Speaker: Zhenwei Luo
Thursday, December 8, 2016
3:00 PM to 4:00 PM


284 BioScience Research Collaborative



In this thesis, we report a novel normal-mode based protocol for modeling anisotropic thermal motions of supramolecular complexes in x-ray crystallographic refinement, named HNMRef. The method models not only the global movements of the whole complex but also the deformational patterns of substructures. Compared with another widely adopted anisotropic thermal parameters refinement method—multi-group TLS, HNMRef delivers much more accurate thermal parameters for the complex and greatly simplifies the choice of substructure partition schemes. The effectiveness of the procedure is demonstrated on the refinements of a set of complexes with moderate resolutions. This protocol was shown to be able to significantly reduce the values of and improve the electron density maps. Moreover, the distribution of anisotropic thermal ellipsoids was much more consistent throughout the whole structure and agreed with the functional structure movements. We expect this protocol to be very effective in the anisotropic refinements of very large and flexible complexes with low or moderate-resolution x-ray diffraction data.

Vanzant Lecture Series: Cas9-Mediated Whole-Cell Engineering

December 8, 2016 - 12:00pm
BioSciences

Speaker: Dr. Alejandro Chavez, MD
Thursday, December 8, 2016
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM


102 Keck Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Hosted by: Dr. Matthew Bennett and the BioSciences Tenure-Track Faculty Search Committee

Leveraging Biomaterials for the Treatment of Large Infected Tissue Defects

December 8, 2016 - 11:00am
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
Bioengineering

Speaker: Alexander Tatara
Thursday, December 8, 2016
11:00 AM to 1:00 PM


284 BioScience Research Collaborative



While the body has an incredible ability to heal, host and external factors may overwhelm its innate regenerative capacity. In these instances, a tissue defect may occur. Tissue defects (regions of either necrotic tissue or void space) are highly susceptible to microbial invasion. Given their proximity to the native micro- and mycobiome, craniofacial and cutaneous defects are at particularly high risk for chronic contamination and infection. The combination of tissue loss and infection creates a negative feedback loop: 1) lack of vascularized healthy tissue leads to a locally immunocompromised area; 2) pathogens are able to colonize the tissue defect and eventually invade the margins of healthy tissue; 3) the resulting pathogenic attack and inflammatory response results in tissue injury and necrosis at the defect border; and 4) the tissue defect expands. Two possible mechanisms to break this cycle are to restore vascularized tissue to the defect site or clear the infection to restore the body’s ability to regenerate tissue. In this dissertation, we seek to develop technologies to treat large tissue defects susceptible to infection through biomaterials-based strategies. First, we investigated and optimized the in vivo bioreactor platform for generating autologous free tissue flaps for mandibular reconstruction. As the engineered tissues grown in these bioreactors are vascularized, their use in mandibular repair restores circulation to the defect site. In a large animal model of disease, we demonstrated that these bioreactors did not require harvested donor tissue, exogenous stem cells, or growth factors in order to generate bony flaps suitable for reconstruction. When transferred to a large mandibular defect in a physiologically-relevant ovine model, these engineered tissues were capable of integrating with the native host tissue for functional craniofacial repair. In the second aim of this work, space maintenance was explored to facilitate the repair of large tissue defects by stimulating the growth of a healthy soft tissue envelope around the defect space as well as functioning as a depot for local delivery of antimicrobial agents to prevent and/or treat infection of the vulnerable large tissue defect. Porous space maintainers were fabricated per good manufacturing practice, subjected to electron beam irradiation, and evaluated for suitability of subsequent mechanical properties. These porous space maintainer devices were then implanted in a superior marginal defect adjacent to the oral mucosa in the mandibular diastema of an ovine model of disease. After nine weeks, space maintainers were removed and the defect was reconstructed with tissue-engineered vascularized flaps generated in 3D-printed bioreactors. Even in a challenging defect environment with proximity to the oral flora and under mechanical load, the space maintainers were able to prevent collapse of tissue into the defect site and maintain a healthy soft tissue envelope for repair. Infection was associated with the single failed case during the use of this strategy. Given the high risk of infection in the setting of large craniofacial defects, econazole-eluting porous space maintainers were developed for the local delivery of an antimicrobial therapeutic during space maintenance. Compared to traditional solid space maintainers, porous space maintainers were able to better inhibit the in vitro growth of common fungal and bacterial pathogens and may be of value in the treatment of tissue defects with infection. Finally, the last aim of this thesis specifically examined novel antifungal approaches for the treatment of infected tissue defects. As there is currently a dearth of animal models of fungal infection relevant to tissue engineering, a murine model with a large cutaneous defect infected with Aspergillus fumigatus was established. A new class of diol-based aliphatic polyesters was synthesized and characterized as polymers whose degradation products have inherent antifungal properties. These diol-based polymers were then fabricated into microparticles and loaded with traditional antifungal therapeutics. After demonstrating extended release of therapeutics in vitro, the microparticles were used to locally treat fungal infection in a large cutaneous defect in an immunocompromised murine model of disease. In sum, this body of work explores biomaterials-based approaches to treat large infected defects, through restoration of tissue and/or by mitigating infection. From leveraging the body’s own innate healing capacity to create vascularized tissue suitable for defect reconstruction (in vivo bioreactors), to utilizing traditional biomaterials in innovative ways (antifungal-eluting bone cement-based space maintainers), to developing new biomaterials with specific antimicrobial applications in mind, we have created a number of strategies to aid in the regeneration of large tissue defects.

Molecular Plasmonics

December 8, 2016 - 10:00am
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
Chemistry

Speaker: Yao Cui
Thursday, December 8, 2016
10:00 AM to 11:00 AM


300 Brockman Hall for Physics



Graphene supports surface plasmons that have been observed to be both electrically and geometrically tunable in the midto far-infrared spectral regions. In particular, it has been demonstrated that graphene plasmons can be tuned across a wide spectral range spanning from the mid-infrared to the terahertz. The identification of a general class of plasmonic excitations in systems containing only a few dozen atoms permits us to extend this versatility into the visible and ultraviolet. As appealing as this extension might be for active nanoscale manipulation of visible light, its realization constitutes a formidable technical challenge. We experimentally demonstrate the existence of molecular plasmon resonances in the visible for ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which we reversibly switch by adding, then removing, a single electron from the molecule. The charged PAHs display intense absorption in the visible regime with electrical and geometrical tunability analogous to the plasmonic resonances of much larger nanographene systems. Finally, we also use the switchable molecular plasmon in PAHs to demonstrate a proof-of-concept low-voltage electrochromic device.

Light Transport in Nanoscale Systems

December 8, 2016 - 9:00am
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
Applied Physics

Speaker: Nathaniel Hogan
Thursday, December 8, 2016
9:00 AM to 10:00 AM


200 Brockman Hall for Physics



What happens as light traverses a medium composed of both traditional materials and many ($10^5-10^{12}$ $cm^{-3}$) nanoparticles? These types of systems are present in many active areas of research in the nanotechnology sphere. Examples include nanoparticles in aqueous and non-aqueous solvents during chemical synthesis or for solar energy harvesting applictions; nanoparticles embedded in homogeneous and non-homogeneous solids for photocatalysis; nanoparticles in biological tissue for medical appplications, and more. Because nanoparticles composed of a certain material can have optical properties very different from the bulk material, these types of systems also display unique optical properties. In this thesis I outline an approach to solving light transport in nanomaterial systems. The approach is shown to be useful in many different systems and for a variety of applications.