Rice University Events Calendar

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Rice University Events Calendar
Updated: 1 month 3 weeks ago

Master’s Recital - Cancelled

February 28, 2017 - 8:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Daniel Egan
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
8:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Master’s Recital - Cancelled
Daniel Egan, trumpet
8:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Master’s Recital

February 28, 2017 - 8:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: David Olsen
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
8:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Master’s Recital
David Olsen, cello
5:30 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Creativity Up Close Lecture: The Surprising Path to Greater Creativity by Keith Sawyer

February 28, 2017 - 7:00pm
Humanities Research Center
Moody Art Center
Glasscock School of Continuing Studies
Arts Initiative Fund
Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative
[CLICK HERE TO REGISTER]

Speaker: Keith Sawyer
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
7:00 PM


Shepherd School | Stude Concert Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Please complete your registration. All lectures are free and open to the public but sitting is limited. This presentation is part of the Creativity Up Close Lecture Series.

Chao Center for Asian Studies Spring 2017 Film Series: <em>Sweet Dream</em> (1936) & <em>Keijo</em> (1940)

February 28, 2017 - 7:00pm
Chao Center for Asian Studies
Dean of Humanities
Rice Cinema

Speaker: Han Sang Kim
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
7:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Rice Media Center
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


In Sweet Dream, Aesun, a Korean Nora Helmer, gets a cab to catch the train that will take her to freedom.

Hiroshi Shimizu’s city symphony film Keijo depicts the streets and shopping promenades of colonial Seoul she might have strolled down.

"New Women on the Move" is a monthly Spring 2017 film series sponsored by the Chao Center of Asian Studies and hosted by Han Sang Kim, Annette and Hugh Gragg Postdoctoral Fellow in Transnational Asian Studies. Part of the ASIA 327 course, every film screening is open to the Rice community and will be followed by an open discussion. Films are shown in Korean with English subtitles.

Sweet Dream (Lullaby of Death) (1936, 47min) and Keijo (1940, 24min) by YANG Chu-nam, SHIMIZU Hiroshi

February 28, 2017 - 7:00pm
Visual and Dramatic Arts
Dean of Humanities
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
7:00 PM to 8:45 PM


Cinema (Rm #100) Rice Media Center
Rice University - Entrance #8, University Blvd & Stockton Ave
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Sweet Dream (Lullaby of Death) (YANG Chu-nam, 1936, 47min) Ae-sun gets a cab to catch the train that will take her to freedom. Sweet Dream is a story of a Korean Nora Helmer who leaves home dreaming of a modern love affair. Keijo (SHIMIZU Hiroshi, 1940, 24min) Hiroshi Shimizu’s city symphony film Keijo depicts the streets and shopping promenades of colonial Seoul Ae-sun might have strolled down.
Additional Information: Free and open to the public

Declaration of Major Signing Ceremony

February 28, 2017 - 6:30pm
Sport Management
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM


Rice Stadium
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA

Registration Required


Each year the Department of Sport Management holds a "Declaration of Major Signing Ceremony" dinner reception for those students who officially declare us as their major. We will provide dinner and then honor each student. This event will feature a guest speaker from the sport industry. Also, representatives from "Rice Sport Business Society" will be present to speak to students about their club and their experience as a Sport Management major. Business professional dress attire **Please register via the Evite invitation by Friday, February 24**

Doctoral Recital

February 28, 2017 - 5:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Timothy Steeves
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
5:00 PM to 6:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Doctoral Recital
Timothy Steeves, violin
5:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Adaptive Program Reasoning via Online Learning

February 28, 2017 - 4:00pm
Computer Science

Speaker: Xin Zhang
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
4:00 PM


1070 Duncan Hall
Reception in Martel Hall before the Seminar
6100 Main St.
Houston,Texas,USA


Software is becoming increasingly pervasive and complex. These trends expose masses of users to unintended software failures and deliberate cyber-attacks. A widely adopted solution to enforce software quality is automated program analysis. A key challenge in designing an effective analysis is to decide what approximations to apply. Approximations are inevitable as program analysis problems are undecidable in general. The state-of-the-art relies on an expert analysis designer to choose fixed approximations. These approximations, however, often fail to meet the needs of individual usage scenarios as software artifacts and analysis clients become increasingly diverse. This in turn hinders the soundness, scalability, and precision of existing analysis tools. To address this challenge, this talk presents an online-learning-based approach that automatically adapts an analysis to a given usage scenario. By adapting to user feedback, program properties of interest, and characteristics of the program at hand, the approach synthesizes approximations that are optimal for the given setting. To enable learning, it converts a conventional program analysis specified by the analysis designer into a probabilistic analysis, which is expressed using a system of weighted constraints. Our empirical evaluation shows that this approach substantially reduces the numbers of false alarms produced by real-world analyses on large and widely used Java programs. I will also describe new algorithmic techniques to solve very large instances of weighted constraints that arise not only in our domain but also in other domains such as Big Data analytics and statistical AI.

BIOE Colloquia Series: Adhesive Hydrogels and Coatings Inspired by Mussels, Tea, Wine, and Chocolate

February 28, 2017 - 4:00pm
Bioengineering
Dean of Engineering

Speaker: Phillip B Messersmith, Ph.D.
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM


280 BioScience Research Collaborative
Rice University
6500 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



Master’s Recital - Cancelled

February 28, 2017 - 12:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: David Mamedov
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Master’s Recital - Cancelled
David Mamedov, piano
12:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Lunch Bunch

February 28, 2017 - 11:30am
Staff Advisory Committee
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
11:30 AM to 1:00 PM


Public Dining Room McMurtry College
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA

Registration Required/Admission Charge


Lunch Bunch for February at McMurtry College. Learn about the history of McMurtry college from various members of its community, including alumni, masters, associates and students.

Narratives of Death and Violence in the Global South, A Poetics of Displacement

February 28, 2017 - 10:00am
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
French Studies

Speaker: Adriana Umana
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
10:00 AM to 12:30 PM


310 Rayzor Hall



The field of French studies, responding to the growth of Francophone studies, has begun to consider the global dimension of French while questioning the very idea of homogeneous national cultures and literary traditions. “Narratives of Death and Violence in the Global South, A Poetics of Dislocation” maps the changing attitudes towards identity and belonging through representations of death in a body of literature produced in the Global South that, though diverse, is transforming notions of national and linguistic borders. Writing death for three writers born in Haiti, Guadeloupe and Colombia marks an important pendulum swing away from the national identifications of cultural productions and towards a transnational and interconnected subjectivity that transcends linguistic and geographic borders. The forms death representations take in their texts are strikingly different from those encountered in other postcolonial works, serving to transcend tragic and accusatory discourses, and offering an emancipatory project grounded on the present. Narratives of death in the postcolonial milieu have often been viewed in terms of their position against European traditions, their desire to return to an imagined and mythical common past, their reparative impulse to reconstruct the world. Critics have underscored their connection to collective memory, political engagement and literary theorization. Still others have pointed to the revitalization these texts effect on arid national literary landscapes. And yet these narratives of death are perhaps most interesting for their fundamental preoccupation with the quotidian, with the non-heroic dimension of characters and for their categorical refusal of genealogies. In “Narratives of Death and Violence ” scenes of death by René Depestre, Maryse Condé and Santiago Gamboa are read against those of their contemporaries to show that by creating characters whose survival depends on their capacity to live in the present, to mediate preposterous situations and to collaborate with equally disparate characters, the writers are advocating for the elaboration of what I term –borrowing from Edouard Glissant – a relational poetics of belonging. Insisting that it is only by renouncing heroism and its accompanying glory that characters are granted an afterlife, I focus on the ways in which death serves to describe the reality of a global imagination where every region is inextricably connected to what happens in the rest of world, and in turn, can only grasp its full meaning after a sense of the whole. Zombification for Depestre, mourning for Condé and violent crime for Gamboa constitute a third space for mediating living in displacement and for framing new possibilities for meaning.

School Composition and Discipline

February 28, 2017 - 10:00am
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
Sociology

Speaker: Horace Duffy
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
10:00 AM to 12:30 PM


250 Sewall Hall



Prior research finds school discipline to be a highly racialized process that contributes to greater inequality. While individual student level characteristics have been found to contribute to the likelihood of receiving an exclusionary punishment, recently there has been interest in how school context, primarily the racial composition, contributes to this trend. Until now, prior research shows that percent black is associated with an increase in punitive disciplinary outcomes, yet little is known about the relationship of percent Latino and punishment. Using data from the Houston Independent School district, the current study examines the association of both individual and school level characteristics and the likelihood a student will receive discipline. This paper concludes that both percent black and Latino are associated with an increase in disciplinary actions and that the most disadvantaged students are most at risk of discipline controlling for other individual characteristics, while advantaged students have lower odd of being disciplined.

Guest Artist Recital

February 27, 2017 - 8:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Eva AmslerArtist: Shalev Ed-Al
Monday, February 27, 2017
8:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Guest Artist Recital
Eva Amsler, Professor of Flute from Florida State University
Shalev Ed-Al, Israeli harpsichordist and conductor
8:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Collegium Concert

February 27, 2017 - 7:30pm
Shepherd School of Music
Monday, February 27, 2017
7:30 PM to 9:00 PM


Hirsch Orchestra Rehearsal Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Collegium Concert
A program of music from the Renaissance.
7:30 p.m., Hirsch Orchestra Rehearsal Hall

Artist Diploma Recital

February 27, 2017 - 5:30pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Tianyang Liu
Monday, February 27, 2017
5:30 PM to 7:00 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Artist Diploma Recital
Tianyang Liu, double bass
5:30 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Choice, manipulation and wellbeing: On the nature and ethical significance of nudging

February 27, 2017 - 4:30pm
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
Philosophy

Speaker: Kerry Vaughan
Monday, February 27, 2017
4:30 PM to 5:30 PM


227 Humanities Building



Recent work in behavioral economics has led to startling conclusions about the limits of human rationality. Contrary to the rational maximizer of utility assumed by traditional economics, actual decision makers make choices that are inconsistent with their own ends and are powerfully influenced by the context in which decisions are presented. Recently, some writers have argued that we ought to use the power of decision making context to offset the inconsistent choice phenomenon. Positions of this kind go alternatively under the banners of “Libertarian Paternalism,” “Choice Architecture,” and “Nudging.” The central idea is that people who shape the context of choices (Choice Architects) should opt to frame choices so all choices remain available (Libertarianism), but should ensure that the choosers are more likely (Nudged) to make choices that make them better off (Paternalism). Despite an explosion in discussion of and use of nudges, philosophers and ethicists have in large part been missing from the conversation. The discussion that has taken place among philosophers has mostly been about whether there is something objectionable about nudges in general. However, as I will argue later in the dissertation, this discussion is of limited use because nudges vary widely in their ethical features. This dissertation advances in five chapters. In chapter 1 I discuss what precisely a nudge is and what it is not. In chapter two I outline a three-factor model for analyzing whether a nudge is morally acceptable. In chapter three I discuss the question of when a nudge makes a chooser better off. I finally defend a new version of the informed desire account which avoids difficulties with the standard informed desire account in the literature. In chapter four I discuss the question of when a nudge is the best available choice, comparing it to rational persuasion, libertarianism and paternalism as possible alternatives. Finally in chapter 5 I discuss two real world applications of the nudging and how the ideas developed elsewhere in the dissertation are used to evaluate these nudges.

Yule's "Nonsense Correlation" Solved!

February 27, 2017 - 4:00pm
Statistics

Speaker: Philip Ernst
Monday, February 27, 2017
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM


1070 Duncan Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


In this talk, I will discuss how I recently resolved a longstanding open statistical problem. The problem, formulated by the British statistician Udny Yule in 1926, is to mathematically prove Yule's 1926 empirical finding of ``nonsense correlation.” I solve the problem by analytically determining the second moment of the empirical correlation coefficient of two independent Wiener processes. Using tools from Fredholm integral equation theory, I calculate the second moment of the empirical correlation to obtain a value for the standard deviation of the empirical correlation of nearly .5. The ``nonsense'' correlation, which I call ``volatile'' correlation, is volatile in the sense that its distribution is heavily dispersed and is frequently large in absolute value. It is induced because each Wiener process is ``self-correlated'' in time. This is because a Wiener process is an integral of pure noise and thus its values at different time points are correlated. In addition to providing an explicit formula for the second moment of the empirical correlation, I offer implicit formulas for higher moments of the empirical correlation. The full paper is currently in press at The Annals of Statistics and can be found at http://www.imstat.org/aos/AOS1509.pdf.

Topology Seminar: To Be Announced

February 27, 2017 - 4:00pm
Mathematics

Speaker: Diana Hubbard
Monday, February 27, 2017
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM


227 Herman Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



An Overview of Full-Waveform Inversion in Exploration Geophysics

February 27, 2017 - 3:00pm
Computational and Applied Mathematics
Dean of Engineering

Speaker: Tom Dickens
Monday, February 27, 2017
3:00 PM to 4:00 PM


1064 Duncan Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


I present an overview of full-waveform inversion (FWI), focusing on its use in seismic exploration. I consider the typical data acquisition scenarios used by industry, and discuss the progression of velocity model building and imaging techniques that have been employed to extract increasing amounts of information from seismic data. FWI has the potential to make the most complete use of seismic data, providing information ranging from improved imaging velocities to maps of rock and fluid properties on sub-wavelength scales.

While the basic mathematics of FWI has been known for decades, only in the last ten years or so have algorithm and compute-power advances made practical application to seismic problems possible. A number of these advances are discussed, following a brief discussion of the basic mathematical techniques used in FWI. Several synthetic examples illustrating the performance of FWI in ideal conditions are then shown. Finally, I look at some examples of the challenges that must be overcome to make FWI usable in real-world scenarios, and present examples of research aimed at solving these problems.