Rice University Events Calendar

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Rice University Events Calendar
Updated: 3 weeks 1 day ago

Guest Artist Master Class

February 27, 2017 - 12:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Eva AmslerArtist: Shalev Ed-Al
Monday, February 27, 2017
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Guest Artist Master Class
Eva Amsler, Professor of Flute from Florida State University
Shalev Ed-Al, Israeli harpsichordist and conductor
12:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Space Physics - A FRAMEWORK FOR FORWARD MODELING SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS FROM HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CORONAL LOOPS

February 27, 2017 - 12:00pm
Physics & Astronomy

Speaker: Will Barnes
Monday, February 27, 2017
12:00 PM to 12:50 PM


227 Herman Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



<strong>Vanzant Lecture Series: Big Data and Analytics for Global Conservation</strong>

February 27, 2017 - 12:00pm
BioSciences

Speaker: Dr. Lydia Beaudrot
Monday, February 27, 2017
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM


102 Keck Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Hosted by: Dr. Tom Miller and the Data Science Initiative Faculty Search Committee

Master’s Recital

February 24, 2017 - 8:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Logan Seith
Friday, February 24, 2017
8:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Master's Recital
Logan Seith, percussion
8:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Master’s Recital

February 24, 2017 - 5:30pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Andrew Payton
Friday, February 24, 2017
5:30 PM to 7:00 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Master’s Recital
Andrew Payton, tuba
5:30 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Vanzant Lecture Series: Title TBD

February 24, 2017 - 4:00pm
BioSciences-Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Speaker: Dr. Rachel Vannette
Friday, February 24, 2017
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM


102 Keck Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Hosted by: Dr. Tom Miller

Keck Seminar, Fernanda Laezza, UTMB

February 24, 2017 - 4:00pm
Gulf Coast Consortia

Speaker: Fernanda Laezza
Friday, February 24, 2017
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM


Auditorium BioScience Research Collaborative
Rice University
6500 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Redesigning Allostery for CNS Drug Discovery Growing appreciation that ion channels and receptors operate as macromolecular complexes, necessitates drug development strategies beyond conventional pharmacology. In the brain, proteinprotein interactions within ion channel complexes offer innovative opportunities in the drug discovery arena. Their highly specific and flexible interfaces define nanodomains that are associated with physiologically- and disease-relevant effects of the ion channels and can be targeted as allosteric surfaces for probe and drug development. During my talk, I will present the discovery and development of new allosteric modulators targeting the voltage-gated Na+ channel, the molecular determinant of the action potential in neurons. Cutting-edge methods ranging from medicinal chemistry, split-luciferase assays, nano LC-MS/MS, single cell and brain circuit electrophysiology to in vivo genetic silencing will be discussed. Inspired by a minimal functional domain top-down approach, our strategy is a paradigm shift in ion channel probe design that will provide a transformative platform to accelerate drug discovery in the CNS.

CEVE Seminar Series 2017 - The Maximum Semicontinuous Flow Problem

February 24, 2017 - 2:00pm
Civil and Environmental Engineering
RICE CENTER FOR OPERATIONS RESEARCH (RCOR)

Speaker: J. Cole Smith
Friday, February 24, 2017
2:00 PM to 3:00 PM


201 Ryon Engineering Building
6100 Main Street
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,United States


This talk examines maximum proportional flow problems having node and arc capacities, along with semicontinuous flow restrictions. Semicontinuous flows are those that are either equal to zero, or are at least as large as some given lower bound. In maximum flow problems, all solutions can be decomposed into a set of origin-destination path flows. For semicontinuous flow problems, one can enforce the condition that the total amount of flow on each arc must satisfy semicontinuity constraints. Alternatively, one could seek to guarantee the existence of a flow decomposition such that the path flows satisfy semicontinuous restrictions. We focus on the latter problem in this presentation, and examine mathematical programming approaches for solving the problem based on column generation strategies. Furthermore, we examine a so-called dynamic flow variation of the problem. In the dynamic flow problem, origin-destination flows are scheduled over time, and any flows transmitted along an arc must persist on the arc for at least some minimum amount of time. This work is jointly authored by Mr. Robert Curry, an IE Ph.D. student at Clemson University

Temporal Forms in the Nineteenth-Century British Mediterranean

February 24, 2017 - 9:00am
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
English

Speaker: Lindsey Chappell
Friday, February 24, 2017
9:00 AM to 12:00 PM


255 Herring Hall



“Almost all that sets us above savages, has come to us from the shores of the Mediterranean,” asserts James Boswell’s Life of Samuel Johnson. Nineteenth-century Britain mapped its narratives of racial and cultural superiority onto these tangible “shores” as British naval dominion from Gibraltar to the Levant opened the circum-Mediterranean region to eager British travelers. This was a geographic contact zone between empires, where the Great Powers jostled for control. But the Mediterranean was also a temporal contact zone for Western imperialists who could not, as they did elsewhere, sweep away existing cultures and histories. Mediterranean heritage, as Boswell had insisted, served as the foundation of Britain’s sense of superiority and the impetus driving countless British tourists to contribute to a booming travel writing market in England. However, travelers who sought the past on these famous shores discovered landscapes teeming with present foreign life. My dissertation, "Temporal Forms in the Nineteenth-Century British Mediterranean," focuses on the conflicts of time that travel brings to the fore of narrative. Firsthand experience in legendary places, I argue, caused travelers to rethink the past. Recent work on transnationalism has yet to account for the fundamental temporal relationship between Britain and the Mediterranean that captivated travelers. Temporal Forms aims to fill this gap, exploring the links among history, narrative, and imperial time that manifest when travelers confront the extant landscapes of their heritage. In "Temporal Forms," I draw on scholarship from three distinct methodologies: historicist work (including empire and travel studies); text-centered work from literary formalism; and scholarship about time from philosophy and the history of science. The resulting methodology I develop is a politically aware formalism that takes time as its object. Each chapter focuses on a different temporal model: inheritance, embeddedness, presentism, and network. Time, I show, functions across narrative sequence and lived experience, organizing both how bodies move through space and how texts codify that movement. For example, in chapter two, “From Vistas to Fractals: Scales of Time and History,” I analyze how antiquarian research at Pompeii produced a site where Britons could imagine a direct connection to what they perceived as their imperial ancestor, Rome. The extraordinary preservation of quotidian Pompeiian life—instead of the great hero tales so familiar through classical education—challenged visitors like Charles Dickens to rethink the scale of historical narrative. When his Pictures from Italy depicts “a history in every stone that strews the ground,” then, I contend that it is reshaping history from a sequence of events to a fractal structure that embeds potentially infinite self-similar moments. Dickens reconfigures models of history that imagine a cultural lineage, as I examine in chapter one, “Inheriting Antiquity.” I argue that, for both Lord Byron and Felicia Hemans, Waterloo becomes a geopolitical lynch-pin connecting Britain to the Mediterranean for antiquaries, politicians, and tourists. As I discuss in chapter three, “Profaning Time and Space in Genre and Geography,” reverential tourism of the early nineteenth century clashed with the demands of mid-Victorian modernization. I show how William Thackeray and Anthony Trollope use character perspective to determine what in the eastern Mediterranean is worth preserving. My final chapter, “Living the Past in the Transnational Network,” analyzes how authors such as Vernon Lee and John Ruskin excavate a transnational history in Florence that forges connections across political boundaries. Heritage proves powerful, with the potential to reinforce imperialism and to incite revolution. It both acts upon and is made by the present. Each model I discuss in Temporal Forms attempts to theorize the convergence of past and present that is heightened in the nineteenth-century Mediterranean.

Deadline: Last day to drop full-term courses online via ESTHER

February 24, 2017 - 12:00am
Academic Calendar
Friday, February 24, 2017




Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



Deadline: Last day for instructors to submit Mid-Semester Grades for first-year undergraduate students online via ESTHER

February 24, 2017 - 12:00am
Academic Calendar
Friday, February 24, 2017




Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



Deadline: College (COLL) course plans due to Dean of Undergraduates office for Fall 2017

February 24, 2017 - 12:00am
Academic Calendar
Friday, February 24, 2017




Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



Deadline: Last day for instructors to submit textbook orders for Summer 2017

February 24, 2017 - 12:00am
Academic Calendar
Friday, February 24, 2017




Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



Deadline: Last day to withdraw with a 30% refund of tuition

February 24, 2017 - 12:00am
Academic Calendar
Friday, February 24, 2017




Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



Deadline: Last day to file an application for a May degree conferral with the Office of the Registrar (Graduate Students only)

February 24, 2017 - 12:00am
Academic Calendar
Friday, February 24, 2017




Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



Chamber Music for Brass

February 23, 2017 - 8:00pm
Shepherd School of Music
Thursday, February 23, 2017
8:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Chamber Music for Brass
Students of the Shepherd School present an all-brass performance.
8:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Medical Professionalism and the Flexner Report

February 23, 2017 - 6:00pm
Humanities Research Center
Academic Advising

Speaker: Bryant Boutwell, Dr. P. H.
Thursday, February 23, 2017
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM


Room 119 Humanities Building
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


In the Medical Leadership Speaker Series, experts will lead discussions on how individuals and institutions have shaped and are shaping our curious system: their contexts, their values, and the political and professional work that has gone into the making of American medicine.

Multi-Sensorial learning through Storytelling in Spanish as a Foreign Language

February 23, 2017 - 5:00pm
Spanish, Portuguese & Latin American Studies
Consulate General of Spain in Houston;
Rice Univ. Spanish Resource Center

Speaker: Francisco Usero González
Thursday, February 23, 2017
5:00 PM to 6:00 PM


305 Sewall Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Let's learn a foreign language with stories "in motion." Lecture will address how storytelling is an important multilingual and multicultural resource for the development of communicative skills in Early Childhood Education in the 21st century. Francisco Usero González holds an M.A. in English. For more information contact Jesús Chico Valencia at (jesus.chico@mecd.es).

Colloquium: Diophantine equations: use and misuse

February 23, 2017 - 4:00pm
Mathematics

Speaker: Tim Browning
Thursday, February 23, 2017
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM


227 Herman Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Integer solutions to polynomial equations have been studied since antiquity. In this talk I will discuss some of the surprising contexts that these equations arise, such as to quantum computing, before describing some recent work specific to cubic equations.