Rice University Events Calendar

Subscribe to Rice University Events Calendar feed
Rice University Events Calendar
Updated: 5 days 23 hours ago

Lunch Bunch

February 28, 2017 - 11:30am
Staff Advisory Committee
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
11:30 AM to 1:00 PM


Public Dining Room McMurtry College
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA

Registration Required/Admission Charge


Lunch Bunch for February at McMurtry College. Learn about the history of McMurtry college from various members of its community, including alumni, masters, associates and students.

Narratives of Death and Violence in the Global South, A Poetics of Displacement

February 28, 2017 - 10:00am
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
French Studies

Speaker: Adriana Umana
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
10:00 AM to 12:30 PM


310 Rayzor Hall



The field of French studies, responding to the growth of Francophone studies, has begun to consider the global dimension of French while questioning the very idea of homogeneous national cultures and literary traditions. “Narratives of Death and Violence in the Global South, A Poetics of Dislocation” maps the changing attitudes towards identity and belonging through representations of death in a body of literature produced in the Global South that, though diverse, is transforming notions of national and linguistic borders. Writing death for three writers born in Haiti, Guadeloupe and Colombia marks an important pendulum swing away from the national identifications of cultural productions and towards a transnational and interconnected subjectivity that transcends linguistic and geographic borders. The forms death representations take in their texts are strikingly different from those encountered in other postcolonial works, serving to transcend tragic and accusatory discourses, and offering an emancipatory project grounded on the present. Narratives of death in the postcolonial milieu have often been viewed in terms of their position against European traditions, their desire to return to an imagined and mythical common past, their reparative impulse to reconstruct the world. Critics have underscored their connection to collective memory, political engagement and literary theorization. Still others have pointed to the revitalization these texts effect on arid national literary landscapes. And yet these narratives of death are perhaps most interesting for their fundamental preoccupation with the quotidian, with the non-heroic dimension of characters and for their categorical refusal of genealogies. In “Narratives of Death and Violence ” scenes of death by René Depestre, Maryse Condé and Santiago Gamboa are read against those of their contemporaries to show that by creating characters whose survival depends on their capacity to live in the present, to mediate preposterous situations and to collaborate with equally disparate characters, the writers are advocating for the elaboration of what I term –borrowing from Edouard Glissant – a relational poetics of belonging. Insisting that it is only by renouncing heroism and its accompanying glory that characters are granted an afterlife, I focus on the ways in which death serves to describe the reality of a global imagination where every region is inextricably connected to what happens in the rest of world, and in turn, can only grasp its full meaning after a sense of the whole. Zombification for Depestre, mourning for Condé and violent crime for Gamboa constitute a third space for mediating living in displacement and for framing new possibilities for meaning.

School Composition and Discipline

February 28, 2017 - 10:00am
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
Sociology

Speaker: Horace Duffy
Tuesday, February 28, 2017
10:00 AM to 12:30 PM


250 Sewall Hall



Prior research finds school discipline to be a highly racialized process that contributes to greater inequality. While individual student level characteristics have been found to contribute to the likelihood of receiving an exclusionary punishment, recently there has been interest in how school context, primarily the racial composition, contributes to this trend. Until now, prior research shows that percent black is associated with an increase in punitive disciplinary outcomes, yet little is known about the relationship of percent Latino and punishment. Using data from the Houston Independent School district, the current study examines the association of both individual and school level characteristics and the likelihood a student will receive discipline. This paper concludes that both percent black and Latino are associated with an increase in disciplinary actions and that the most disadvantaged students are most at risk of discipline controlling for other individual characteristics, while advantaged students have lower odd of being disciplined.

Guest Artist Recital

February 27, 2017 - 8:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Eva AmslerArtist: Shalev Ed-Al
Monday, February 27, 2017
8:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Guest Artist Recital
Eva Amsler, Professor of Flute from Florida State University
Shalev Ed-Al, Israeli harpsichordist and conductor
8:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Collegium Concert

February 27, 2017 - 7:30pm
Shepherd School of Music
Monday, February 27, 2017
7:30 PM to 9:00 PM


Hirsch Orchestra Rehearsal Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Collegium Concert
A program of music from the Renaissance.
7:30 p.m., Hirsch Orchestra Rehearsal Hall

Artist Diploma Recital

February 27, 2017 - 5:30pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Tianyang Liu
Monday, February 27, 2017
5:30 PM to 7:00 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Artist Diploma Recital
Tianyang Liu, double bass
5:30 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Choice, manipulation and wellbeing: On the nature and ethical significance of nudging

February 27, 2017 - 4:30pm
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
Philosophy

Speaker: Kerry Vaughan
Monday, February 27, 2017
4:30 PM to 5:30 PM


227 Humanities Building



Recent work in behavioral economics has led to startling conclusions about the limits of human rationality. Contrary to the rational maximizer of utility assumed by traditional economics, actual decision makers make choices that are inconsistent with their own ends and are powerfully influenced by the context in which decisions are presented. Recently, some writers have argued that we ought to use the power of decision making context to offset the inconsistent choice phenomenon. Positions of this kind go alternatively under the banners of “Libertarian Paternalism,” “Choice Architecture,” and “Nudging.” The central idea is that people who shape the context of choices (Choice Architects) should opt to frame choices so all choices remain available (Libertarianism), but should ensure that the choosers are more likely (Nudged) to make choices that make them better off (Paternalism). Despite an explosion in discussion of and use of nudges, philosophers and ethicists have in large part been missing from the conversation. The discussion that has taken place among philosophers has mostly been about whether there is something objectionable about nudges in general. However, as I will argue later in the dissertation, this discussion is of limited use because nudges vary widely in their ethical features. This dissertation advances in five chapters. In chapter 1 I discuss what precisely a nudge is and what it is not. In chapter two I outline a three-factor model for analyzing whether a nudge is morally acceptable. In chapter three I discuss the question of when a nudge makes a chooser better off. I finally defend a new version of the informed desire account which avoids difficulties with the standard informed desire account in the literature. In chapter four I discuss the question of when a nudge is the best available choice, comparing it to rational persuasion, libertarianism and paternalism as possible alternatives. Finally in chapter 5 I discuss two real world applications of the nudging and how the ideas developed elsewhere in the dissertation are used to evaluate these nudges.

Yule's "Nonsense Correlation" Solved!

February 27, 2017 - 4:00pm
Statistics

Speaker: Philip Ernst
Monday, February 27, 2017
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM


1070 Duncan Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


In this talk, I will discuss how I recently resolved a longstanding open statistical problem. The problem, formulated by the British statistician Udny Yule in 1926, is to mathematically prove Yule's 1926 empirical finding of ``nonsense correlation.” I solve the problem by analytically determining the second moment of the empirical correlation coefficient of two independent Wiener processes. Using tools from Fredholm integral equation theory, I calculate the second moment of the empirical correlation to obtain a value for the standard deviation of the empirical correlation of nearly .5. The ``nonsense'' correlation, which I call ``volatile'' correlation, is volatile in the sense that its distribution is heavily dispersed and is frequently large in absolute value. It is induced because each Wiener process is ``self-correlated'' in time. This is because a Wiener process is an integral of pure noise and thus its values at different time points are correlated. In addition to providing an explicit formula for the second moment of the empirical correlation, I offer implicit formulas for higher moments of the empirical correlation. The full paper is currently in press at The Annals of Statistics and can be found at http://www.imstat.org/aos/AOS1509.pdf.

Topology Seminar: To Be Announced

February 27, 2017 - 4:00pm
Mathematics

Speaker: Diana Hubbard
Monday, February 27, 2017
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM


227 Herman Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



An Overview of Full-Waveform Inversion in Exploration Geophysics

February 27, 2017 - 3:00pm
Computational and Applied Mathematics
Dean of Engineering

Speaker: Tom Dickens
Monday, February 27, 2017
3:00 PM to 4:00 PM


1064 Duncan Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


I present an overview of full-waveform inversion (FWI), focusing on its use in seismic exploration. I consider the typical data acquisition scenarios used by industry, and discuss the progression of velocity model building and imaging techniques that have been employed to extract increasing amounts of information from seismic data. FWI has the potential to make the most complete use of seismic data, providing information ranging from improved imaging velocities to maps of rock and fluid properties on sub-wavelength scales.

While the basic mathematics of FWI has been known for decades, only in the last ten years or so have algorithm and compute-power advances made practical application to seismic problems possible. A number of these advances are discussed, following a brief discussion of the basic mathematical techniques used in FWI. Several synthetic examples illustrating the performance of FWI in ideal conditions are then shown. Finally, I look at some examples of the challenges that must be overcome to make FWI usable in real-world scenarios, and present examples of research aimed at solving these problems.


Guest Artist Master Class

February 27, 2017 - 12:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Eva AmslerArtist: Shalev Ed-Al
Monday, February 27, 2017
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Guest Artist Master Class
Eva Amsler, Professor of Flute from Florida State University
Shalev Ed-Al, Israeli harpsichordist and conductor
12:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Space Physics - A FRAMEWORK FOR FORWARD MODELING SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS FROM HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CORONAL LOOPS

February 27, 2017 - 12:00pm
Physics & Astronomy

Speaker: Will Barnes
Monday, February 27, 2017
12:00 PM to 12:50 PM


227 Herman Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



<strong>Vanzant Lecture Series: Big Data and Analytics for Global Conservation</strong>

February 27, 2017 - 12:00pm
BioSciences

Speaker: Dr. Lydia Beaudrot
Monday, February 27, 2017
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM


102 Keck Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Hosted by: Dr. Tom Miller and the Data Science Initiative Faculty Search Committee

Master’s Recital

February 24, 2017 - 8:00pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Logan Seith
Friday, February 24, 2017
8:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Master's Recital
Logan Seith, percussion
8:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Master’s Recital

February 24, 2017 - 5:30pm
Shepherd School of Music

Artist: Andrew Payton
Friday, February 24, 2017
5:30 PM to 7:00 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Master’s Recital
Andrew Payton, tuba
5:30 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Vanzant Lecture Series: Title TBD

February 24, 2017 - 4:00pm
BioSciences-Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Speaker: Dr. Rachel Vannette
Friday, February 24, 2017
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM


102 Keck Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Hosted by: Dr. Tom Miller

Keck Seminar, Fernanda Laezza, UTMB

February 24, 2017 - 4:00pm
Gulf Coast Consortia

Speaker: Fernanda Laezza
Friday, February 24, 2017
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM


Auditorium BioScience Research Collaborative
Rice University
6500 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Redesigning Allostery for CNS Drug Discovery Growing appreciation that ion channels and receptors operate as macromolecular complexes, necessitates drug development strategies beyond conventional pharmacology. In the brain, proteinprotein interactions within ion channel complexes offer innovative opportunities in the drug discovery arena. Their highly specific and flexible interfaces define nanodomains that are associated with physiologically- and disease-relevant effects of the ion channels and can be targeted as allosteric surfaces for probe and drug development. During my talk, I will present the discovery and development of new allosteric modulators targeting the voltage-gated Na+ channel, the molecular determinant of the action potential in neurons. Cutting-edge methods ranging from medicinal chemistry, split-luciferase assays, nano LC-MS/MS, single cell and brain circuit electrophysiology to in vivo genetic silencing will be discussed. Inspired by a minimal functional domain top-down approach, our strategy is a paradigm shift in ion channel probe design that will provide a transformative platform to accelerate drug discovery in the CNS.

CEVE Seminar Series 2017 - The Maximum Semicontinuous Flow Problem

February 24, 2017 - 2:00pm
Civil and Environmental Engineering
RICE CENTER FOR OPERATIONS RESEARCH (RCOR)

Speaker: J. Cole Smith
Friday, February 24, 2017
2:00 PM to 3:00 PM


201 Ryon Engineering Building
6100 Main Street
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,United States


This talk examines maximum proportional flow problems having node and arc capacities, along with semicontinuous flow restrictions. Semicontinuous flows are those that are either equal to zero, or are at least as large as some given lower bound. In maximum flow problems, all solutions can be decomposed into a set of origin-destination path flows. For semicontinuous flow problems, one can enforce the condition that the total amount of flow on each arc must satisfy semicontinuity constraints. Alternatively, one could seek to guarantee the existence of a flow decomposition such that the path flows satisfy semicontinuous restrictions. We focus on the latter problem in this presentation, and examine mathematical programming approaches for solving the problem based on column generation strategies. Furthermore, we examine a so-called dynamic flow variation of the problem. In the dynamic flow problem, origin-destination flows are scheduled over time, and any flows transmitted along an arc must persist on the arc for at least some minimum amount of time. This work is jointly authored by Mr. Robert Curry, an IE Ph.D. student at Clemson University

Temporal Forms in the Nineteenth-Century British Mediterranean

February 24, 2017 - 9:00am
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
English

Speaker: Lindsey Chappell
Friday, February 24, 2017
9:00 AM to 12:00 PM


255 Herring Hall



“Almost all that sets us above savages, has come to us from the shores of the Mediterranean,” asserts James Boswell’s Life of Samuel Johnson. Nineteenth-century Britain mapped its narratives of racial and cultural superiority onto these tangible “shores” as British naval dominion from Gibraltar to the Levant opened the circum-Mediterranean region to eager British travelers. This was a geographic contact zone between empires, where the Great Powers jostled for control. But the Mediterranean was also a temporal contact zone for Western imperialists who could not, as they did elsewhere, sweep away existing cultures and histories. Mediterranean heritage, as Boswell had insisted, served as the foundation of Britain’s sense of superiority and the impetus driving countless British tourists to contribute to a booming travel writing market in England. However, travelers who sought the past on these famous shores discovered landscapes teeming with present foreign life. My dissertation, "Temporal Forms in the Nineteenth-Century British Mediterranean," focuses on the conflicts of time that travel brings to the fore of narrative. Firsthand experience in legendary places, I argue, caused travelers to rethink the past. Recent work on transnationalism has yet to account for the fundamental temporal relationship between Britain and the Mediterranean that captivated travelers. Temporal Forms aims to fill this gap, exploring the links among history, narrative, and imperial time that manifest when travelers confront the extant landscapes of their heritage. In "Temporal Forms," I draw on scholarship from three distinct methodologies: historicist work (including empire and travel studies); text-centered work from literary formalism; and scholarship about time from philosophy and the history of science. The resulting methodology I develop is a politically aware formalism that takes time as its object. Each chapter focuses on a different temporal model: inheritance, embeddedness, presentism, and network. Time, I show, functions across narrative sequence and lived experience, organizing both how bodies move through space and how texts codify that movement. For example, in chapter two, “From Vistas to Fractals: Scales of Time and History,” I analyze how antiquarian research at Pompeii produced a site where Britons could imagine a direct connection to what they perceived as their imperial ancestor, Rome. The extraordinary preservation of quotidian Pompeiian life—instead of the great hero tales so familiar through classical education—challenged visitors like Charles Dickens to rethink the scale of historical narrative. When his Pictures from Italy depicts “a history in every stone that strews the ground,” then, I contend that it is reshaping history from a sequence of events to a fractal structure that embeds potentially infinite self-similar moments. Dickens reconfigures models of history that imagine a cultural lineage, as I examine in chapter one, “Inheriting Antiquity.” I argue that, for both Lord Byron and Felicia Hemans, Waterloo becomes a geopolitical lynch-pin connecting Britain to the Mediterranean for antiquaries, politicians, and tourists. As I discuss in chapter three, “Profaning Time and Space in Genre and Geography,” reverential tourism of the early nineteenth century clashed with the demands of mid-Victorian modernization. I show how William Thackeray and Anthony Trollope use character perspective to determine what in the eastern Mediterranean is worth preserving. My final chapter, “Living the Past in the Transnational Network,” analyzes how authors such as Vernon Lee and John Ruskin excavate a transnational history in Florence that forges connections across political boundaries. Heritage proves powerful, with the potential to reinforce imperialism and to incite revolution. It both acts upon and is made by the present. Each model I discuss in Temporal Forms attempts to theorize the convergence of past and present that is heightened in the nineteenth-century Mediterranean.

Deadline: Last day to drop full-term courses online via ESTHER

February 24, 2017 - 12:00am
Academic Calendar
Friday, February 24, 2017




Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA