Rice University Events Calendar

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Rice University Events Calendar
Updated: 5 days 23 hours ago

Deadline: Last day for instructors to submit Mid-Semester Grades for first-year undergraduate students online via ESTHER

February 24, 2017 - 12:00am
Academic Calendar
Friday, February 24, 2017




Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



Deadline: College (COLL) course plans due to Dean of Undergraduates office for Fall 2017

February 24, 2017 - 12:00am
Academic Calendar
Friday, February 24, 2017




Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



Deadline: Last day for instructors to submit textbook orders for Summer 2017

February 24, 2017 - 12:00am
Academic Calendar
Friday, February 24, 2017




Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



Deadline: Last day to withdraw with a 30% refund of tuition

February 24, 2017 - 12:00am
Academic Calendar
Friday, February 24, 2017




Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



Deadline: Last day to file an application for a May degree conferral with the Office of the Registrar (Graduate Students only)

February 24, 2017 - 12:00am
Academic Calendar
Friday, February 24, 2017




Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA



Chamber Music for Brass

February 23, 2017 - 8:00pm
Shepherd School of Music
Thursday, February 23, 2017
8:00 PM to 9:30 PM


Duncan Recital Hall Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Chamber Music for Brass
Students of the Shepherd School present an all-brass performance.
8:00 p.m., Duncan Recital Hall

Medical Professionalism and the Flexner Report

February 23, 2017 - 6:00pm
Humanities Research Center
Academic Advising

Speaker: Bryant Boutwell, Dr. P. H.
Thursday, February 23, 2017
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM


Room 119 Humanities Building
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


In the Medical Leadership Speaker Series, experts will lead discussions on how individuals and institutions have shaped and are shaping our curious system: their contexts, their values, and the political and professional work that has gone into the making of American medicine.

Multi-Sensorial learning through Storytelling in Spanish as a Foreign Language

February 23, 2017 - 5:00pm
Spanish, Portuguese & Latin American Studies
Consulate General of Spain in Houston;
Rice Univ. Spanish Resource Center

Speaker: Francisco Usero González
Thursday, February 23, 2017
5:00 PM to 6:00 PM


305 Sewall Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Let's learn a foreign language with stories "in motion." Lecture will address how storytelling is an important multilingual and multicultural resource for the development of communicative skills in Early Childhood Education in the 21st century. Francisco Usero González holds an M.A. in English. For more information contact Jesús Chico Valencia at (jesus.chico@mecd.es).

Colloquium: Diophantine equations: use and misuse

February 23, 2017 - 4:00pm
Mathematics

Speaker: Tim Browning
Thursday, February 23, 2017
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM


227 Herman Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Integer solutions to polynomial equations have been studied since antiquity. In this talk I will discuss some of the surprising contexts that these equations arise, such as to quantum computing, before describing some recent work specific to cubic equations.

AMO - TWO-ELEMENT MIXTURE OF BOSE AND FERMI SUPERFLUIDS

February 23, 2017 - 4:00pm
Physics & Astronomy

Speaker: Subhadeep Gupta
Thursday, February 23, 2017
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM


300 Brockman Hall for Physics
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


By combining ultracold gases of two different elements, new quantum systems may be explored. I will present our realization of a two-element mixture of Bose and Fermi superfluids, a system out of reach with liquid helium mixtures. We use bosonic ytterbium and fermionic lithium, which feature a strong mismatch in mass and distinct electronic properties, and demonstrate elastic coupling between the superfluids by observing the shift in dipole oscillation frequency of the bosonic component due to the presence of the fermions. The measured magnitude of the shift is consistent with a mean-field model and its direction determines the previously unknown sign of the interspecies scattering length to be positive. We also observe the exchange of angular momentum between the superfluids from the excitation of a scissors mode in the bosonic component through interspecies interactions. I will also report on photoassociation spectroscopy in the ytterbium-lithium system, towards the production of ultracold polar molecules with a spin degree of freedom.

Rethinking algorithms in Data Science: Scaling up optimization using non-convexity, provably

February 23, 2017 - 4:00pm
Ken Kennedy Institute for Information Technology
Bioengineering
Computational and Applied Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Statistics
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
Office of the Provost
Computer Science
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Chemistry
Dean of Engineering

Speaker: Dr. Anastasios Kyrillidis
Thursday, February 23, 2017
4:00 PM to 5:00 PM


1064 Duncan Hall
Reception following lecture at 5:00 p.m. in Martel Hall
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


With the quantity of generated data ever-increasing in most research areas, conventional data analytics run into solid computational, storage, and communication bottlenecks. These obstacles force practitioners to often use algorithmic heuristics, in an attempt to convert data into useful information, fast. It is necessary to rethink the algorithmic design, and devise smarter and provable methods in order to flexibly balance the trade-offs between solution accuracy, efficiency, and data interpretability. In this talk, I will focus on the problem of low rank matrix inference in large-scale settings. Such problems appear in fundamental applications such as structured inference, recommendation systems and multi-label classification problems. I will introduce a novel theoretical framework for analyzing the performance of non-convex first-order methods, often used as heuristics in practice. These methods lead to computational gains over classic convex approaches, but their analysis is unknown for most problems. This talk will provide precise theoretical guarantees, answering the long-standing question “why such non-convex techniques behave well in practice?” for a wide class of problems. I will discuss implementation details of these ideas and, if time permits, show the superior performance in applications found in physical sciences and machine learning.

MSNE Seminar Series - Prof. David L. Bourell "Metal Issues in Additive Manufacturing” (450/451/500)

February 23, 2017 - 3:00pm
Materials Science & NanoEngineering

Speaker: David L Bourell
Thursday, February 23, 2017
3:00 PM to 4:00 PM


180 Dell Butcher Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Additive Manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing, has over the last seven years moved from an esoteric research topic to a household word. This phenomenal growth has sparked new interest in understanding and extending the scope of the field. In this presentation, the growth forecast of AM will be presented. A review of issues associated with direct metal AM will be given which includes part microstructure, defects and mechanical properties. Future trends in metal AM will also be presented. Included will be a current research effort in the presenter’s lab on direct metal processing of commercially interesting aluminum alloys, specifically AA6061.

Design of ssDNA Micelles and Nanotubes for Targeting Cancer

February 23, 2017 - 2:30pm
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Speaker: Dr. Efie Kokkoli
Thursday, February 23, 2017
2:30 PM to 3:30 PM


210 Herzstein Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


In my group, we design peptide- or aptamer- functionalized nanoparticles for targeting cancer. In this presentation I will discuss our efforts to target a molecule called fractalkine with aptamer-amphiphiles. Fractalkine bears potential for novel therapeutics due to its unique structure and its central role as a mediator of human disease processes such as inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Currently, no therapeutics targeting fractalkine exist. We have recently developed a ssDNA aptamer that binds to fractalkine, and formed micelles out of aptamer-amphiphiles. Our work shows that we can successfully target fractalkine with our ssDNA micelles both in vitro and in vivo in a mouse model of colon cancer, thus providing opportunities to use fractalkine as a molecular target in different diseases. I will also discuss how we design ssDNA-amphiphiles that selfassemble into supramolecular nanostructures with non-spherical geometries, such as ssDNA nanotubes, and how we use these ssDNA nanotubes to target glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common form of primary brain cancer, in vitro and in vivo in an orthotopic mouse model of GBM.

NPP - STAR HIGH LEVEL TRIGGER

February 23, 2017 - 2:00pm
Physics & Astronomy

Speaker: Hongwei Ke
Thursday, February 23, 2017
2:00 PM to 3:00 PM


223 Herman Brown Hall
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


We implemented a High-Level Trigger (HLT) system for the STAR experiment to better utilize the luminosity delivered by RHIC. By reconstructing tracks and assembling data from multiple detectors, STAR HLT can select events of great physics interests online, which will reduce the data volume to tape, speed up offline physics analysis and provide vital online monitoring information. In the past a few years, a series of important physics achievements and programs of STAR have benefited from HLT, including the discovery of anti-alpha particles, the first J/\Psi elliptic flow measurement, the Beam Energy Scan program phase I and more recently the STAR heavy flavor tracker and muon telescope detector program. Currently, STAR HLT has 10 times of the computing resources than we had in 2012, which contains about 1200 CPU cores and 45 Xeon Phi (KNC) coprocessors. In this talk, I will discuss the development of STAR HLT, lessons we learned of using such a heterogeneous system and most importantly the physics opportunities opened with these resources.

Floodgates - A composition for full orchestra

February 23, 2017 - 1:00pm
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
Shepherd School of Music

Speaker: Daniel Knaggs
Thursday, February 23, 2017
1:00 PM to 2:00 PM


conference room Alice Pratt Brown Hall



The present composition is written in response to the apparently escalating global crises in the political, economic, social, and cultural spheres. The current age finds itself in a sort of permanent warzone, too often seeking solutions in heated rhetoric, arms, and pointing fingers. However, in light of these problems, this work’s objective is not to simply “vent” or dwell in negativity. Instead, it points toward hope in an avenue that that the world has left largely unexplored: that of mercy. In order to musically incorporate the idea of mercy, this work includes quotations from Gregorio Allegri’s “Miserere” (c. 1630), a choral setting of Psalm 51 in which King David takes full responsibility for his crimes and faults while asking for mercy. The composition races through moments of both anxiety and determination, culminating in a climactic moment in which the “floodgates” burst and the orchestra evokes images of torrential downpour along with restatements from Allegri’s “Miserere…” Finally, the present work is left somewhat open-ended or unresolved, in order to not prematurely celebrate what is still left up to the world to live out.

Strain-Sensing Smart Skin for Structural Health Monitoring

February 23, 2017 - 9:30am
Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies
Civil and Environmental Engineering

Speaker: Peng Sun
Thursday, February 23, 2017
9:30 AM to 11:30 AM


112 Ryon Engineering Building



Over the past twenty years, many structural health monitoring strategies and damage detection techniques/methods have been proposed. Traditional technologies used for measuring strain, such as resistance strain gages, can monitor only at discrete locations and along specific directions, and have limited ability to measure strains on small length scales. Optical fiber sensors and more specifically fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are also widely used in health monitoring of structures, offering strain and temperature readings. However, practical issues, such as deployment of the optical fibre to the structure and connectors and the high cost of the FBGs, need to be addressed. Some emerging full-filed non-contact strain sensing techniques, such as interferometric techniques, non-interferometric techniques and Raman spectroscopy techniques, have other limitations. A non-contact, full-filed strain sensing technique is needed to perform fast Structural Health Monitoring on structures. In this thesis, the prototype generation of a novel non-contact strain measurement technology is developed using raw HiPco single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and a commercial urethane varnish. This approach exploits the characteristic short-wave infrared fluorescence signatures of semiconducting SWCNTs and the systematic shifts of their fluorescence wavelengths when the nanotubes are axially strained. A strain-sensing smart skin (S4) is prepared by coating the surface to be monitored with a thin film of a composite containing well dispersed SWCNTs embedded in a polymeric host. Strain in the substrate is transmitted through the polymer to the nanotubes, causing systematic and predictable spectral shifts of the nanotube near-infrared fluorescence peak wavelengths. This promising new method should allow quick and precise strain measurements at any position and along any direction of the substrate.

(Church & Society Series) Immigrants' Rights and the American Civil Liberties Union of Texas

February 12, 2017 - 9:30am
Boniuk Institute for Religious Tolerance

Speaker: Edgar Saldivar
Sunday, February 12, 2017
9:30 AM to 10:30 AM



St. Philip Presbyterian Church
4807 San Felipe Street
Houston,Texas,USA


The ACLU of Texas is dedicated to reclaiming constitutional and civil rights for all Texans, regardless of immigration status. Immigrants in Texas contribute to our diversity and enrich our economy, but immigrant communities continue to be profiled, harassed, detained and demonized by extremist politicians and the militarized law enforcement agencies they control. Edgar Saldivar, Senior Staff Attorney for American Civil Liberties Union of Texas shares his passion to seek justice for the most vulnerable and underserved in our society.

2017 CLIC Conference on Study Abroad: Understanding the Study Abroad Experience

February 10, 2017 - 8:00am
Center for Languages and Intercultural Communication
Friday, February 10, 2017 - Saturday, February 11, 2017
8:00 AM to 5:30 PM



Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA

Admission Charge


For more information or to register for this event go to: clicstudyabroadconference.rice.edu

Tenth Annual Southern Forum on Agricultural, Rural, and Environmental History

February 10, 2017 - 12:01am
History
Friday, February 10, 2017 - Saturday, February 11, 2017
All Day


328 Humanities Building
Rice University
6100 Main St
Houston,Texas,USA


Rice University
February 10–11, 2017
Support provided by the Rice University History Department’s David Potter Lectureship in Southern History Fund
All sessions—including the keynote address—will take place in the Humanities Building, Room 328
Attendance is free, but registration is required if you wish to take part in any of the three meals provided. To register for meals, please email Randal Hall at rh@rice.edu and list the meals you would like to attend.

Friday, February 10, 2017
3:00 p.m.
Opening remarks
3:15 to 5:15 p.m.
Crossing Cultures in the Nineteenth Century:
Joseph Thomas Carson IV, Rice University
“Between Two Ships: Environmental History and the Anthropocene in Melville’s Oceans”

Patrick Luck, Florida Polytechnic University
“‘Your Friend Meuillon’: Cross-Cultural Economic Alliances in the Lower Mississippi Valley during the Early Republic”

Cane West, University of South Carolina
“‘Well Timbered and Watered’: Cross-Cultural Environmental Discourse in the Antebellum Arkansas River Valley”

5:30 to 6:45 p.m.
Humanities Building, third floor foyer and lounge
Drinks and dinner, buffet-style, catered by Picos Restaurant
Open to participants and any registered attendees

7:00 p.m.
Keynote Address S. Max Edelson, University of Virginia “The New Map of Empire: Cartographic Visions of Development in the British Atlantic World”

Saturday, February 11, 2017
9:00 to 9:30 a.m.
Humanities Building, third floor foyer and lounge
Continental breakfast for participants and registered attendees

9:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Food, Culture, and Landscape:
Hannah Biggs, Rice University “‘Louis Bromfield's 'Sermons on the Mount’: Religious Regionalism and Food Faith”

James C. Giesen, Mississippi State University “The View From Rose Hill: Landscape and Memory in the Piedmont”

Kelly C. Kean, University of California, Davis “Staples and Specialties: Regional Production for the Urban Market in Nineteenth-Century Charleston, South Carolina”

11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Lunch break
A boxed lunch will be provided for participants and any registered attendees.

12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
Resources and the State in the Interwar Years:
Davis Allen, Case Western Reserve University “Conservation Competition: Perspectives on Agricultural Drainage During the New Deal Era”

Abby Spinak, Rice University “The Most Laissez Faire: International Comparison as Energy Policy in the Interwar United States”

Michael Weeks, Our Lady of the Lake University “Measuring Expertise: How Engineers and Water Managers Shaped Irrigation on the Plains from 1910 to 1940”

2:45 to 3:00 p.m. Coffee break

3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Power, Economy, and Ecology in the Deep South:
Andrew C. Baker, Texas A&M University–Commerce “Rachel Carson’s Unlikely Disciples: Texas Real Estate Developers and the Battle against Hydrilla”

Alec Fazackerley Hickmott, Amherst College “From Equality to Enterprise: Civil Rights and the Strange Career of Federal Enterprise Zones in the Mississippi Delta, 1965–1993”

Caroline R. Peyton, Cameron University “The Plantation and the Reactor: Nuclear Power, Envirotechnical Risk, and the Louisiana Way”

http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~rh/SFARE.html