Nathan Citino

Associate Professor
B.A. from the University of Notre Dame
Ph.D. from Ohio State University
713-348-2553
Humanities 314
Areas of Interest: 
  • United States and the World
  • Middle East
  • Modernization and Development
  • Modern U.S.
Research and Teaching: 

 

Nathan J. Citino is a historian of the U.S. and the World specializing in the Middle East.  Dr. Citino graduated with a B.A. from the University of Notre Dame, completed an Arabic language program at the University of Chicago, and received his Ph.D. from Ohio State University.  He is the author of From Arab Nationalism to OPEC:  Eisenhower, King Sa‘ud, and the Making of US - Saudi Relations as well as articles published in Diplomacy & Statecraft,  the International Journal of Middle East Studies, the Business History Review, the Arab Studies Journal, and Cold War History.  His chapter on U.S.-Iraqi relations appears in a volume published in Harvard’s Cold War Studies Series, and his essay on frontiers and borderlands will be included in an updated edition of Explaining the History of American Foreign Relations.  Dr. Citino’s second book,  Envisioning the Arab Future:  Modernization in US-Arab Relations, 1945-1967, is under contract with Cambridge University Press.  From 2001-2014, Dr. Citino was associate editor of Diplomatic History. He has also served on the board of editors of the International Journal of Middle East Studies.  In 2011-12 he received a research fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies, and in fall 2014 he was a fellow at the Institute of Advanced Study, Durham University. 

 

Dr. Citino teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in the history of the U.S. and the World and in modern U.S. history.

Selected Publications: 
  • From Arab Nationalism to OPEC:  Eisenhower, King Sa‘ud, and the Making of U.S.-Saudi Relations.  Indiana Series in Middle East Studies. Bloomington:  Indiana University Press, 2002, 2010.
  • “The Ghosts of Development: The United States and Jordan’s East Ghor Canal,” Journal of Cold War Studies 16:2 (Fall 2014):  159-88.
  • “The ‘Crush’ of Ideologies:  The United States, the Arab World, and Cold War Modernization,” Cold War History 12 (January 2012):  89-110.
  • “The Ottoman Legacy in Cold War Modernization,” International Journal of Middle East Studies 40 (November 2008):  579-97.